Education

Deadlines

March 03, 2004 6 min read
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TEACHER FELLOWSHIPS, CONTESTS, AND AWARDS

March 15—Call for Proposals: Applications are due for proposals for the Peace as a Global Language Conference, sponsored by Kyoto University in Kyoto, Japan. Proposals should be formatted as panel discussions, workshops, research presentations, or poster sessions. Topics include, but are not limited to, education, health, gender, alternative education, and teaching/learning issues.Contact: John T. Denny, Kyoto University; e-mail: kyotopgl2004@yahoo.com; Web site: www.eltcalendar.com/PGL2004.

March 15—Technology: Applications are due for the inaugural Sylvia Charp technology award from T.H.E. Journal and the International Society for Technology in Education. The award will recognize one U.S. school district for its effective use of technology. The recipient will be honored at the National Educational Computing Conference in June 2004.Contact: Chris Taver, ISTE; (800) 336-5191; Web site: www.iste.org.

March 22— Principals: Applications are due for Excellence in Education Awards from HEB, an Austin, Texas-based grocery chain. The awards recognize K-12 teachers and principals within the HEB service area who have shown outstanding service in their schools. Teachers are eligible to receive cash awards ranging from $5,000 to $25,000. Principals with at least five years of experience could receive $25,000 in cash and matching grants for their schools. Contact: Jill Reynolds, HEB, 6929 Airport Boulevard, Suite 176, Austin, TX 78752; (512) 421- 1048; fax: (512) 421-1093; e-mail: reynolds.jill@heb.com; Web site: www.heb.com.

March 31—Facilities: Applications are due for the Kids Karpet contest. Applicants will be asked to submit a 200-word essay outlining their financial needs and why Kids Karpet surfacing would work best for their playgrounds. Public and private elementary schools, parks, and child- care facilities are eligible to apply. Winners will receive 100 cubic yards of Kids Karpet playground surfacing. Contact: Garick Corporation, 13600 Broadway Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44125; (216) 581-0100; e-mail: kidskarpet@garick.com; Web site: www.kidskarpet.com.

April 15—Achievement: Applications are due for the Discourse Challenge, sponsored by the Educational Testing Service. K-12 schools and districts are eligible to apply. Participants will receive Discourse starter edition software to use in their classrooms for 30 days. A principal and a teacher will be asked to each submit a 500-word essay describing the benefits of the software. The grand prize winner will receive an HP Mobile Classroom, a license for Discourse software, and an all-expenses paid trip to the National Educational Computing Conference. Contact: DC, Rosedale Road, MS 43-L, Princeton, NJ 08541; Web site: www.discourse.com.

April 19— Teachers: Applications are due for the All-USA Teacher Team Contest, sponsored by USA TODAY. Full-time, K-12 teachers with at least four years of teaching experience who have shown excellence in a variety of teaching environments are eligible to be nominated. Twenty individuals and instructional teams will be honored by USA Today and share a cash prize of $2,500. Contact: USA Today, Carol Skalski, 7950 Jones Branch Drive, Third Floor, McLean, VA 22108-9995; Web site: www.education.usatoday.com.

April 30—Achievement: Applications are due for ING Unsung Heroes awards sponsored by ING, an Atlanta-based marketing communications company. The awards recognize progressive thinking and classroom projects in education. K-12 public and private school teachers, principals, and paraprofessionals are eligible to apply. One hundred finalists will each receive $2,000 and the grand prize winner will receive $25,000.Contact: Cheryl Krause, Scholarship America, One Scholarship Way, PO Box 297, St. Peter, MN 56082; (800) 537-4180; e-mail: ing@csfa.org; Web site: www.ing.com/unsungheroes.

April 30—Teachers: Applications are due for the 2003-2004 Teacher of the Year Award, sponsored by the Teachers’ Insurance Plan, an auto insurance company based in Meriden, Conn. The award, which recognizes outstanding educators, is open to public and private elementary, middle, and high school teachers in Connecticut, New York, and Pennsylvania. One winner from each state will receive a $1,000 award and a $500 school grant. Contact: TIP, 500 S. Broad St., Meriden, CT 06450; (888) 288-6080; Web site: www.teachers.com.

STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS, CONTESTS, AND AWARDS

March 15—Writing: Applications are due for the Kids Are Authors writing competition from Scholastic Book Fairs. Students in grades K-8 are asked to work in groups of three or more to create a fictional or nonfictional illustrated picture book. Twenty-five schools will each receive honorable mentions and $200 in merchandise from Scholastic as well as a certificate of merit for each student. Two grand prize winning schools will each receive $2,000 in merchandise, 100 copies of their published book, and a framed award certificate and medallion for each student. Contact: Kids Are Authors, SBF, 1080 Greenwood Boulevard, Lake Mary, FL 32746; (800) 874-4809; Web site: teacher.scholastic.com /fairs/kaa/rules.htm.

March 26—Fellowships: Applications are due for fellowships from the Davidson Institute for Talent Development. The fellowships honor K-12 students in the U.S. who excel in science, technology, mathematics, music, literature, or philosophy. Recipients can receive between $10,000 and $50,000 in scholarships. Contact: Julie Dudley, DITD; e-mail: jdudley@ditd.org; Web site: www.davidsonfellows.org.

April 5—Technology: Applications are due for the 2004 Tech Museum Awards, sponsored by Applied Materials, Inc. The awards recognize individuals or groups that utilize technology solutions to help the global community. Five winners will be selected from each of the following categories: Equality, Environment, Economic Development, Education, and Health. One recipient in each category will receive a $50,000 cash prize. Contact: The Tech Museum of Innovation,201 South Market St., San Jose, CA 95113; (408) 795-6338; e-mail: techawards@thetech.org; Web site: www.techawards.thetech.org.

April 10—Geography: Applications are due for the Lewis and Clark Geography Contest, sponsored by Capstone Press. The contest is open to students in grades K-9. Participants must research and create a presentation on at least 52 historical landmarks, monuments, museums, or national parks within the United States. The winning school will receive a grant of $1,500 in books and a state geography series. Contact: What’s Great About our 52 States? Contest, CP, 7825 Telegraph Road, Bloomington, MN 55438; (800) 747-7992; e- mail: customer.service@capstone- press.com; Web site: www.capstone-press.com.

April 30—Civic education: Applications are due for the Gloria Barron Prize for Young Heroes. The award honors young leaders who have made a positive impact on their communities or are involved in projects that make a difference in other peoples’ lives. Students ages 8 to 18 in the United States or Canada are eligible to apply. Ten recipients will each receive $2,000 awards. Contact: The Barron Prize, PO Box 17, Boulder, CO 80306; (970) 875-1448; Web site: www.barronprize.org.

April 30—History: Applications are due for the Holocaust Remembrance Project National Contest, sponsored by the Holland Knight Charitable Foundation. High school students in the United States are eligible to apply. The contest encourages students to study and think about the Holocaust and the value of human life and dignity. Each participant will be asked to write a 1,200-word essay discussing the reasons why society should remember the Holocaust. Ten first place winners will each receive an all-expenses paid trip to the U.S Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington and a scholarship of up to $5,000. Contact: HRPNC, HKCF, PO Box 2877, Tampa, FL 33601; (866) 452-2737; e-mail: holocaust@hklaw.com; Web site: www.holocaust.hklaw.com.


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