Education

City Leaders to Gather in Support of After-School

By Nora Fleming — July 26, 2013 1 min read

Five states will bring together state and local leaders to discuss how their states can improve and promote after-school programs and expanded learning.

These “mayoral summits,” to be held next year, are billed as the first ever to focus exclusively on after school, according to a press release from the National League of Cities, a Washington-based organization that is providing technical assistance to launch the events.

The summits, hosted by after-school networks in the five states—New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, South Dakota, and Utah—will feature mayors from all participating states. These summits build on others that took place in 2009, 2010, and 2012, covering 14 other states.

Financial support for the summits is being provided by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation and the Wallace Foundation. (The latter supports coverage of expanded learning, among other topics, in Education Week.)

The Wallace Foundation has supported citywide systems for after-school and extended learning opportunities for some time. In 2003, it underwrote a project with five cities to build citywide systems for after-school programs. The foundation currently is working on a similar project with nine other cities: Baltimore; Denver; Fort Worth, Texas; Jacksonville, Fla.; Grand Rapids, Mich.; Louisville, Ky.; Nashville, Tenn.; Philadelphia; and St. Paul, Minn.

The topic of systemswide collaboration for out-of-school programs was the focus of a conference I attended a few months ago in Baltimore, summarized in the recently released report: “Better Together—Building Local Systems to Improve After-School.” The National League of Cities and the Wallace Foundation were part of a group of organizations that also included the American Youth Policy Forum, the Collaborative for Building After-School Systems, and the Forum for Youth Investment that hosted the event.

The report includes recommendations for how to build systems for after-school, profiles of leading research and programs in the field, and examples of how some communities (and leaders) have tackled challenges to building out-of-school programs.

A version of this news article first appeared in the Beyond School blog.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Future of Work Webinar
Digital Literacy Strategies to Promote Equity
Our new world has only increased our students’ dependence on technology. This makes digital literacy no longer a “nice to have” but a “need to have.” How do we ensure that every student can navigate
Content provided by Learning.com
Mathematics Online Summit Teaching Math in a Pandemic
Attend this online summit to ask questions about how COVID-19 has affected achievement, instruction, assessment, and engagement in math.
School & District Management Webinar Examining the Evidence: Catching Kids Up at a Distance
As districts, schools, and families navigate a new normal following the abrupt end of in-person schooling this spring, students’ learning opportunities vary enormously across the nation. Access to devices and broadband internet and a secure

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Speech Therapists
Lancaster, PA, US
Lancaster Lebanon IU 13
Elementary Teacher
Madison, Wisconsin
One City Schools

Read Next

Education Obituary In Memory of Michele Molnar, EdWeek Market Brief Writer and Editor
EdWeek Market Brief Associate Editor Michele Molnar, who was instrumental in launching the publication, succumbed to cancer.
5 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: December 9, 2020
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: Stories You May Have Missed
A collection of articles from the previous week that you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: Stories You May Have Missed
A collection of stories from the previous week that you may have missed.
8 min read