Education

Awards

January 01, 2001 6 min read
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Following are application deadlines for awards, honors, and contests available to teachers. Asterisks (*) denote new entries.

January 5 HALL OF FAME
The National Teachers Hall of Fame is accepting nominations for its 2001 induction. Active or retired certified preK-12 teachers with at least 20 years of classroom experience are eligible. Five teachers are selected to be represented in the Hall of Fame Gallery and receive an expenses-paid trip to the induction ceremony June 21-24. For more information, contact: National Teachers Hall of Fame, 1320 C of E Dr., Emporia, KS 66801; (800) 968-3224; fax (316) 341-5912; e-mail hallfame@emporia.edu; www.nthf.org.

*January 5 LEADERSHIP
As part of its new Leadership for a Changing World awards program, the Ford Foundation seeks nominations of community leaders across the country who are successfully tackling tough social problems. The awards recognize individuals or leadership teams who have worked for at least two years in fields such as economic and community development, human rights, the arts, education, sexual and reproductive health, religion, media, and the environment. Twenty leaders receive $100,000 to advance their work, plus $30,000 for supporting activities. The program includes a major, multi-year research initiative and numerous forums to bring awardees together with other leaders to share experiences, address specific challenges, and explore opportunities for collaboration. For more information, contact: Leadership for a Changing World, Advocacy Institute, 1629 K St. N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20006-1629; (202) 777-7560; e-mail info@leadershipforchange.org; www.leadershipforchange.org.

*January 14 TEACHER OF THE YEAR
The American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences, Glencoe/McGraw-Hill publishers, and the Teacher of the Year Endowment Fund sponsor the Teacher of the Year Award. Candidates must be full-time K-12 teachers of family and consumer sciences and have been members of the AAFCS for the past three years. The winner receives $1,000 plus up to $500 to cover travel expenses to the AAFCS annual meeting in Chicago in June. For more information, contact: Charlotte Island, Coordinator, Development and Awards, AAFCS, 1555 King St., Alexandria, VA 22314-2752; (703) 706-4600.

February 1 BIOLOGY
Prentice Hall, a textbook publisher, and the National Association of Biology Teachers invite biology teachers of grades 7-12 to apply for the Outstanding Biology Teacher Award. Candidates must have at least three years of experience teaching in public or private schools. Teachers can nominate themselves or their colleagues. Winners are selected from each of the 50 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico, Canada, and the overseas territories. For more information, contact: Louise Pittack, Awards Manager, National Association of Biology Teachers, 12030 Sunrise Valley Dr., Suite 110, Reston, VA 20191-3409; (703) 264- 9696 or (800) 406-0775; e-mail nabter@aol.com; www.nabt.org.

February 1 LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION
The American Association of School Librarians and SIRS Inc. offer the $2,000 Distinguished School Administrators Award to a school administrator who has developed an exemplary school library media program and improved the library media center as an educational facility. Candidates must be nominated by AASL members. For more information, contact: AASL/SIRS Distinguished School Administrators Award, AASL, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611-2795; (800) 545- 2433, ext. 4383; www.ala.org/aasl/awards.html.

*February 1 SESAME STREET
Children’s Television Workshop and Sesame Street Parents magazine have established the Sunny Days Awards to honor outstanding people who do great work for children’s learning. Professionals working to improve children’s lives with programs that are creative, can be easily replicated, and make an appreciable difference in children’s lives are eligible. Winners are honored in Sesame Street Parents and act as advisers to the magazine’s projects. For more information, contact: Sunny Days Awards, Sesame Street Parents, One Lincoln Plaza, New York, NY 10023; e-mail sspletters@sesameworkshop.org.

*February 1 TEACHING EXCELLENCE
Time for Teachers magazine and Chevy Malibu announce the second annual Teaching Excellence Awards program to honor extraordinary teachers who demonstrate quality and innovation in their instruction. K-12 teachers may nominate themselves or a colleague. One grand-prize winner receives a Chevy Malibu and $2,000 for classroom use. Other prizes include $1,000 and Time for Kids classroom subscriptions. For more information, call (800) 777-8600 or go to www.timeforkids.com/teachers.

*February 5 AVIATION
The General Aviation Manufacturers Association announces the Excellence in Aviation Education Award, offered to K-12 teachers who have developed curricula incorporating aviation. The number of winners varies; each receives $500 and is recognized at the National Congress on Aviation and Space Education in April. Contact: Bridgette Bailey, GAMA, 1400 K St. N.W., Suite 801, Washington, DC 20005-2485; (202) 393-1500; www.generalaviation.org.

*February 12 MATH AND SCIENCE
The National Science Foundation and the White House present the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching Program. Recognition is given to K-12 teachers in four groups: elementary science, elementary mathematics, secondary mathematics, and secondary science. Up to 216 teachers from each state and each U.S. jurisdiction receive a $7,500 NSF grant for their schools to be spent over a three-year period on improving mathematics and science programs. Contact your state science or mathematics coordinator via the NSF Web site at www.nsf.gov/pa.

February 15 ENVIRONMENT
The National Association for Humane and Environmental Education is accepting nominations for the National KIND Teacher. The award honors an outstanding K-6 teacher who has consistently included topics advocated by the association in his or her curriculum. The winner receives an award plaque and a free year’s subscription to KIND News for every classroom in his or her school. For more information, contact: NAHEE, P.O. Box 362, East Haddam, CT 06423-0362; (860) 434-8666; e-mail nahee@nahee.org; www.nahee.org.

*February 28 CHILDREN’S FICTION
Highlights for Children is seeking submissions of humorous children’s stories for its 22nd annual fiction contest. Stories should not exceed 900 words; they may be considerably shorter for younger children. Three winners receive $1,000 each, and their stories appear in the publication. Other contest submissions are considered for purchase by Highlights. Contact: Fiction Contest, Highlights for Children, 803 Church St., Honesdale, PA 18431.

*March 1 KOREAN STUDIES
The Korea Society invites teachers of grades 8-12 to submit essays discussing either the impact of the Internet on the relationship between Korea and America or the challenges facing U.S. companies that do business in the Korean market. Cash prizes are awarded; a grand-prize winner also gets a weeklong trip for two to Korea. For more information, contact: Director, Korean Studies, Korea Society, 950 Third Ave., 8th Fl., New York, NY 10022; (212) 759-7525, ext. 25; www.essayonkorea.org.

— Kate Ryan


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