May 11, 2016

This Issue
Vol. 35, Issue 30
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A massive new database reveals the extent of educational inequities in more than 12,000 school districts.
Digital learning tools that don't disrupt the educational status quo tend to be the most widely adopted, despite their limited impact on student learning, a study finds.
A national campaign aims to raise awareness in schools about the importance of pronouncing students' names correctly.
Town hall meetings, online surveys, and task forces aim to hear what the public thinks about the Every Student Succeeds Act as the NCLB law's successor rolls out.
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Although they find parts of their jobs immensely rewarding, many teachers feel ignored in education policy discussions and are frustrated with the constantly changing demands on them, a new survey finds.
Seven months ago, an elite group of colleges and universities created a new application system intended to help disadvantaged students find their way to higher education. Now, the group has hired its first executive director.
In at least 35 districts in 14 states, hundreds of unaccompanied minors from Central America were discouraged from enrolling in schools or pressured into what advocates and lawyers argue are separate but unequal alternative programs—essentially an academic dead end, and one that can violate federal law.
The lowest-performing high school seniors are slipping in reading and math on the National Assessment of Education Progress. Why?
Best of the Blogs
Reports of student victimization at public schools continue long pattern of decline while students' fear of harm at school also drops.
Articles in this special report explore the efforts states and school districts are making to effectively teach English-language learners.
Increased transparency is a key part of the new Every Student Succeeds Act, which replaced the NCLB law, boosting the information-reporting requirements for states and districts.
The state's governor and legislature are struggling to agree on a spending plan, amid competing proposals on how to distribute K-12 education dollars.
When considering the progress of current education improvement efforts, policymakers must bear one scientific principal in mind, warns Arthur H. Camins.
To mitigate the impact of poverty, schools need more resources and better policies, say Helen Ladd, Pedro Noguera, Paul Reville, and Joshua Starr.
We must seize the moment to provide more funding and support for vital physical education resources, writes former NFL player Herschel Walker.
With the details for ESSA implementation still unfolding, it’s a key time to seek stakeholder input, write Martin J. Blank and Kent McGuire.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the NoVo Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the Walton Family Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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