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Legislative Update

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The following are summaries of governors' budget requests for schools and highlights of proposals on the state education agendas. Budget totals for K-12 education include money for state education administration, but do not include federal flow-through dollars.

CALIFORNIA

Governor:
Pete Wilson (R)

FY 1999 proposed state budget:
$55.5 billion

FY 1999 proposed K-12 budget:
$23.5 billion

FY 1998 K-12 budget:
$22.4 billion

Percent change K-12 budget:
+4.9 percent

Estimated enrollment:
5.6 million

Highlights:

  • Budget includes $350 million to lengthen school year to minimum of 180 instructional days. Because of time set aside for staff development, students in some districts now receive as few as 172 instructional days.
Gov. Pete Wilson
  • Governor proposes spending $52 million for scholarships to enable up to 15,000 students in low-performing districts to attend other public or private schools.
  • Budget directs districts to use $99 million in projected lottery proceeds for textbooks.
  • Some $40 million in first-time funding would go to teacher training in state's new math standards. And budget nearly doubles, to $33.6 million, funding for programs that support and assess new teachers.
  • Budget proposes $1.5 million for Commission on Teacher Credentialing to develop new performance assessment for teacher candidates.

FLORIDA

Governor:
Lawton Chiles (D)

FY 1999 proposed state budget:
$45.1 billion

FY 1999 proposed K-12 budget:
$6.9 billion

FY 1998 K-12 budget:
$6.5 billion

Percent change K-12 budget:
+6.2 percent

Estimated enrollment:
2.4 million

Highlights:

  • Budget includes $53.3 million for educational resources and technology and $20 million for reading programs for elementary pupils.
Gov. Lawton Chiles
  • Spending plan earmarks $606.6 million to create health-care program for uninsured children, $60.3 million for child-abuse-prevention programs, and $21.3 million to finance expansion of Healthy Families program, which targets families with infants or children at risk for neglect or abuse.
  • Governor recommends $80 million to expand child-care programs for working poor and $2 million for efforts to reduce teenage pregnancy.

KANSAS

Governor:
Bill Graves (R)

FY 1999 proposed state budget:
$8.55 billion

FY 1999 proposed K-12 budget:
$2.1 billion

FY 1998 K-12 budget:
$1.93 billion

Percent change K-12 budget:
+8.8 percent

Estimated enrollment:
449,500

Highlights:

  • Governor recommends increase in fiscal 1999 base budget of $35 per pupil to provide total of $3,705 per pupil, at total cost of $19.85 million.
  • Budget also includes increased funding for Early Head Start programs of $5 million, to total of $23.3 million under the Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services. Funding would expand existing programs and pay for an estimated six new programs.
  • Through collaboration with Emporia State University, state education department will establish program to promote teacher excellence through standards set by National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Total of $125,000 from general fund was provided for this initiative.

OKLAHOMA

Governor:
Frank Keating (R)

FY 1999 proposed state budget:
$4.7 billion

FY 1999 proposed K-12 budget:
$1.68 billion

FY 1998 K-12 budget:
$1.62 billion

Percent change K-12 budget:
+3.7 percent

Estimated enrollment:
615,600

Highlights:

  • Budget reflects $16 million growth in funding under state aid formula.
  • Governor proposes connecting all schools to state telecommunications network for $8.7 million.
  • Mr. Keating also proposes raising teacher salaries by $21 million.
  • Budget provides $10 million to provide Advanced Placement courses and governor's "4x4" initiative at every high school in state.

UTAH

Governor:
Michael O. Leavitt (R)

FY 1999 proposed state budget:
$6.06 billion

FY 1999 proposed K-12 budget:
$2.09 billion

FY 1998 K-12 budget:
$1.94 billion

Percent change K-12 budget:
+7.7 percent

Estimated enrollment:
479,000

Highlights:

  • Governor proposes $4.5 million for Schools for the 21st Century program, which would provide extra money to exemplary schools.
  • Spending plan includes $17.4 million for middle school initiative, including funding to reduce class sizes.

WASHINGTON

Governor:
Gary Locke (D)

FY 1998-1999 biennial state budget:
$19.1 billion

FY 1998-1999 proposed biennial K-12 budget:
$8.85 billion

FY 1996-1997 biennial K-12 budget
$8.36 billion

Percent change K-12 budget:
+5.9 percent

Estimated enrollment:
951,000

Highlights:

  • Figures reflect two-year budget periods, for fiscal 1996-97 and 1998-99. Latter figure includes governor's supplemental K-12 request.
  • Governor proposes $25 million for volunteer and paid tutors to provide reading instruction and tutoring to 82,000 students in grades 2-5.
  • Budget also includes $3.2 million for training teams of teachers, principals, and administrators in ways to develop effective reading programs for elementary students.

VIRGINIA

Governor:
James S. Gilmore III (R)

FY 1999-2000 proposed biennial state budget:
$19 billion

FY 1999-2000 proposed biennial K-12 budget:
$6.8 billion

FY 1997-1998 biennial K-12 budget
$6.0 billion

Percent change K-12 budget:
+13.3 percent

Estimated enrollment:
1.2 million

Highlights:

  • In keeping with Virginia law, outgoing Gov. George F. Allen proposed 1999-2000 budget and new Gov. Gilmore will make amendments. Figures reflect two-year budget cycle.
  • While he has not said whether he would endorse a 13 percent increase in K-12 education aid, Mr. Gilmore has proposed $38 million program to hire 2,000 new elementary school teachers by 2000.
  • Mr. Gilmore has also vowed to support charter school legislation.

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