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Nov. 26--Music education: Proposals are due for the 1995 Music Teachers National Association national convention, to be held March 25-30, 1995, in Albuquerque, N.M. Papers, panels, performances, lecture-recitals, demonstrations, research, and creative projects are welcome. Contact: 1995 Convention Program Steering Committee, M.T.N.A., Carew Tower, 441 Vine St., Suite 505, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202-2814.

Nov. 30--School-industry cooperation: Entries are due for the National Association for Industry-Education Cooperation's 1993 awards program. The Educational Sponsorship Award honors a business firm, trade association, or professional organization for creative and effective cooperation with public or postsecondary schools; the Utilization Award recognizes the outstanding skill and success of a public or postsecondary educator in using industry's resources in his or her programs. Winners will receive a plaque and citation. Contact: Richard J. McCowan, 1993 Awards Committee Chairman, N.A.I.E.C., 235 Hendricks Blvd., Buffalo, N.Y. 14226-3304.

Dec. 1--Science education: Entries are due for the 53rd annual Westinghouse Science Talent Search, for scientifically talented high school seniors. A group of 40 finalists will share $205,000 in prize money. Contact: Science Talent Search, 1719 N St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036; (202) 785-2255.

  • Dec. 10--Educator awards: Nominations are due for Reader's Digest "American Heroes in Education'' awards. Teachers and principals at the elementary through high school level may be nominated either individually or in teams of up to six teachers and administrators within a school. Ten individuals or teams will each receive a cash award of $5,000, and each winner's school will receive an incentive award of $10,000 to support the programs or activities that earned the recognition. Contact: Claudia Edwards-Watts, Director, A.H.E.A., R.D. Association, Reader's Digest Rd., Pleasantville, N.Y. 10570-7000.
  • Dec. 10--Education research: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for projects to conduct field-intitiated studies to advance education theory and practice. An estimated 12 awards ranging from $50,000 to $90,000 each will be awarded to school districts, institutions of higher education, and other public and private nonprofit organizations, and individuals, including teachers. Contact: Delores Monroe, U.S.E.D., 555 New Jersey Ave., N.W., Room 620, Washington, D.C. 20208-2223.

Dec. 10--Poetry contest: Entries are due for the sixth annual Ann Arlys Bowler Poetry Contest, sponsored by Read magazine. An award of $100 will go to each of six students who submit the best poems. Contact: A.A.B.P.C., Weekly Reader Corporation, 245 Long Hill Rd., Middletown, Conn. 06457; (203) 638-2406 or 638-2695.

  • Dec. 15--Environmental partnerships: Proposals are due for the Phillips Educational Partnership Awards, sponsored by Phillips Petroleum. An estimated 73 awards of $500 to $5,000 will be granted to primary and secondary schools and adult nonprofit community organizations and nature centers that propose a well-thought approach to meeting an environmental need. Contact: Phillips Petroleum Company, P.E.P. Program, 16 D1 PB, Bartlesville, Okla. 74004.

Dec. 15--Students with disabilities: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under the Program for Children With Severe Disabilities. For research projects for educating children with severe disabilities in inclusive settings, an estimated three awards of about $175,000 each will be granted to public or nonprofit private organizations or institutions. Contact: Dawn Hunter, U.S.E.D., 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 4620, Switzer Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20202-2644; (202) 205-5809; TDD: (202) 205-8169.

Dec. 17--Students with disabilities: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Services for Children With Deaf-Blindness Program, which provides assistance to address the special needs of infants, toddlers, children, and youths with deaf-blindness. An estimated four awards from a total of $680,000 in available funds will be granted to public or nonprofit private agencies, institutions, or organizations, including American Indian tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (if acting on behalf of schools operated by the bureau for children and students on reservations) and tribally controlled schools funded by the Interior Department. Contact: Charles Freeman, U.S.E.D., 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 4617, Switzer Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20202-2644; (202) 205-8165; TDD: (202) 205-8169.

Dec. 17--Students with disabilities: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Secondary Education and Transitional Services for Youth With Disabilities Program for model demonstration projects to identify and develop alternatives for youths with disabilities who have dropped out of school, or are at risk of dropping out. An estimated five awards of about $106,000 each will be awarded to institutions of higher education, state or local education agencies, and other public or nonprofit private institutions or agencies. Contact: Michael Ward, U.S.E.D., 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 4624, Switzer Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20202-2644; (202) 205-8163; TDD: (202) 205-8169.

Dec. 20--Career education: Entries are due for the 1994 American Association for Career Education Citations for Career Education Initiatives. Awards will honor excellence in 16 categories, including management, counseling, assessment, evaluation, curriculum, research, in-service education, partnerships and collaboratives, publications, and public information. Contact: Pat Nellor Wickwire, President, A.A.C.E., 2900 Amby Pl., Hermosa Beach, Calif. 90254-2216; (310) 376-7378.

  • Dec. 22--Youth talent search: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Talent Search Program, intended to identify qualified youths who are low-income and potential first-generation college students and to encourage them to complete high school and enroll in postsecondary education; to publicize the availability of student financial assistance at the postsecondary level; and to encourage persons who have not completed secondary education to re-enter such programs. An estimated 300 awards ranging from $180,000 to $450,000 each will be awarded to institutions of higher education, public and private agencies and organizations, and combinations of institutions, agencies, and organizations. Contact: Prince O. Teal, U.S.E.D., 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 5065, Washington, D.C. 20202-5249; (202) 708-4804.

Dec. 23--Student contests: Entries are due for the Weekly Reader Essay Contest, sponsored by Read magazine and the Library of Congress, and for the Writing and Art Awards Contest, also sponsored by the magazine. The essay contest is open to students in grades 6-12; this year's theme is "Books Change Lives.'' A letter of no more than 1,000 words, written to an author, should explain how reading the author's book has changed the student's life. Contact: Read, (203) 638-2622. For writing- and art-contest rules, contact: Read Writing and Art Awards, Weekly Reader Corporation, 245 Long Hill Rd., Middletown, Conn. 06457; (203) 638-2406 or 638-2695.

Jan. 5--Humanities: Applications are due for the Independent Study in the Humanities Fellowship Program, sponsored by the Council for Basic Education and funded primarily by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Teachers and librarians may apply individually or in two-person teams for over 175 awards of $3,200 each (stipend for six weeks of study plus book award); principals may apply for awards of $2,100 each (stipend for four weeks of study plus book award). Contact: C.B.E., Attn: 94-I, P.O. Box 135, Ashton, Md. 20861.

  • Jan. 7--Special education: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Program for Children and Youth With Serious Emotional Disturbance, to support projects for improving special education and related services for these young people. An estimated two awards of $175,000 each for the first 12 months of the projects will be awarded to institutions of higher education, state and local education agencies, and other appropriate public and private nonprofit institutions or agencies. Contact: Darlene Crumblin, U.S.E.D., 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 3525, Washington, D.C. 20202-2641; (202) 205-8953.

Jan. 10--Substance abuse: The U.S. Health and Human Services Department is inviting applications for projects to conduct meetings and conferences to coordinate and exchange information on preventing tobacco, alcohol, and other substance abuse. Conferences should focus on knowledge dissemination, consensus-building, and health promotion concepts and practices among high-risk youths. An estimated 15 projects, funded at up to $50,000 each, will be awarded to local education agencies, higher-education institutions, and other public and private nonprofit and for-profit organizations. Contact: Office of Budget, Planning, and Evaluation, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, U.S. Health and Human Services Department, Rockwall II, Ninth Floor, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, Md. 20857, (301) 443-6980.

  • Jan. 14--Quality schools: Proposals are due for the third national conference on "Creating the Quality School,'' to be held March 31-April 2 at the Holiday Inn Airport West in Oklahoma City, Okla. Administrators, teachers, and school board members are invited to submit proposals for papers and presentations that focus on issues of increased educational success and opportunity for all students. Contact: Edward W. Chance, Director, Center for the Study of Small and Rural Schools, University of Oklahoma, 555 East Constitution, Room 313, Norman, Okla., 73037-0005; (405) 325-1450.

Jan. 14--Students with disabilities: The U.S. Education Department is inviting applications for new awards under its Research in Education of Individuals with Disabilities Program. The awards are intended to advance and improve the knowledge base and improve the practice of professionals, parents, and others, including regular educators, who provide early intervention, special education, and related services to children with disabilities. For field-initiated research projects of up to 60 months in duration, an estimated 20 grants of about $100,000-$180,000 a year will be awarded to state and local education agencies, institutions of higher education, and other public agencies and nonprofit private organizations. Contact: Darlene Crumblin, U.S.E.D., 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 3525, Switzer Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20202-2641; (202) 205-8953. TDD:Call the Federal Dual Party Relay Service, (800) 877-8339.

Jan. 15--Gifted children: Applications are due for the 1994 International Hollingworth Award Competition, for proposed research in the area of the education or psychology of gifted children and youths, sponsored by the Intertel Foundation Inc. The award consists of a $2,000 cash grant and certificate. Contact (with self-addressed, stamped envelope): Roxanne H. Cramer, Chairman, Hollingworth Award Committee, 4300 Sideburn Rd., Fairfax, Va. 22030-3507.

Jan. 15--Professional development: Applications are due for two programs sponsored by the Esther A. and Joseph Klingenstein Center at Teachers College, Columbia University. The Klingenstein Fellowship provides a year of study at Teachers College to 12 teachers and administrators in private secondary schools who have more than five years of professional experience; fellows receive an $11,000 tuition allowance and a $23,000 stipend, among other benefits. The Klingenstein Visiting Fellows Program for Heads of Independent Schools features a month of symposia examining the issues confronting independent school leaders; the fellowship includes housing, full tuition, and participation in a variety of cultural events. Any head of an independent K-12 school that has a nondiscriminatory admissions policy is eligible to apply. Contact: E.A. & J.K.C., Teachers' College, Columbia University Box 125, New York, N.Y. 10027; (212) 678-3449.

Jan. 19: Science and mathematics: Applications are due for the Sci-Mat Fellowship Program, sponsored by the Council for Basic Education and funded primarily by the National Science Foundation. Seventy teams of two teachers each--one science or mathematics teacher and one humanities teacher--will be awarded fellowships of $2,600 per team (stipend plus book award) to study linking the sciences and the humanities in a setting of their choosing. Contact: C.B.E., Attn: 94-S, P.O. Box 135, Ashton, Md. 20861.

  • Jan. 27--Bilingual education: The U.S. Department of Education is inviting applications for short-term training to improve the skills of education personnel and parents participating in programs for limited-English proficient persons. An estimated 29 awards ranging from $75,000 to $150,000 each will be granted to local education agencies, state education agencies, and private for-profit or nonprofit organizations that apply after consulting L.E.A.s and S.E.A.s. Contact: Petraine Johnson, U.S.E.D., 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 5086, Switzer Building, Washington, D.C. 20202-6642; (202) 205-8722.
  • Jan. 28--Bilingual education: The U.S. Department of Education is inviting applications for projects to identify and disseminate effective bilingual education practices for limited-English-proficient students. The awards are intended to support projects helping L.E.P. children historically underserved by L.E.P. programs and involving children from low-income families. An estimated 26 grants ranging from $50,000 to $150,00 each will be awarded to local education agencies, higher education institutions, and private nonprofit organizations applying separately or jointly. Contact: Mary Mahony, U.S.E.D., 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 5086, Washington, D.C. 20202-6642; (202) 205-8722.

Jan. 31--Social studies: Nominations are due for the Middle States Council for the Social Studies 1993-1994 awards, recognizing educators in the field of the social studies. Nominators must be members of the M.S.C.S.S., and nominators and nominees must be educators. Contact: Edward J. Rielly, 25 Clay Ave., Apt. 406, Scranton, Pa. 18510-2192.

  • Feb. 1--Music: Applications are due for the Interlochen scholarship program, sponsored by the National Federation of Music Clubs. Two partial scholarships of $1,635 each will be awarded for eight weeks of summer music study at Interlochen Arts Camp in Interlochen, Mich. The scholarship competition is open to students in grades 10-12 who are currently studying piano, voice, or orchestral instruments. Contact: Van Mills, 2710 Leland Dr., Jackson, Mich. 49203; (517) 782-8703.
  • Feb. 1--Science: Entries are due for the ExploraVision competition, sponsored by the National Science Teachers Association and Toshiba. Students in grades K-12, working in teams of three or four under the supervision of a teacher, are invited to submit a description paper and a story board illustrating technology at work in the community. Four winning teams will receive savings bonds ranging from $5,000 to $10,000. Contact: N.S.T.A., E.V. Awards, 1742 Connecticut Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20009; (202) 328-5800.

Feb. 11--Science and technology: Entries are due for the NYNEX Science and Technology Awards, sponsored by the NYNEX Foundation and administered by the National Science Teachers Association. Teams of two to four high school students from New York, Massachusetts, Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Connecticut are invited to devise practical solutions to community problems using science and technology. The three top teams will receive will be awarded development grants totaling $250,000 to bring their winning ideas closer to reality. Contact: (800) 9X-TEAMS.

Feb. 28--Geography: Entries are due for the fifth annual American Express Geography Competition, sponsored by the American Express Philanthropic Program, for students in grades 6-12. Eighteen teams of students will share the $100,000 in prize money. Contact: (800) 395-GLOBE.

March 1--History and social studies: Applications are due for the 1994 James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation awards, for in-service high school teachers of American history, American government, and social studies and for graduating or recently graduated collegians who wish to become secondary school teachers of these subjects. The $24,000 awards cover tuition, fees, books, and room and board associated with study leading to master's degrees in American history or political science or education with concentrations in the framing, principles, and history of the U.S. Constitution. Stipends cover five years of part-time study by teachers or two years of full-time study by recent baccalaureates. At least one fellowship is awarded annually to a recipient in each state, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and, taken together, the other territories. Contact: James Madison Memorial Fellowship Program, P.O. Box 4030, Iowa City, Iowa, 52243-4030; (800) 525-6928; fax: (319) 337-1204.

  • March 1--Summer seminars: The Division of Fellowships and Seminars of the National Endowment for the Humanities is inviting applications for summer seminars on a variety of texts in the humanities. Full-time or regular part-time teachers of grades 7-12 at public, private, or parochial schools are invited to apply for one seminar. For each seminar, 15 teachers will be awarded stipends of $2,450, $2,825, or $3,200 each, depending on the length of the seminar. Contact: Public Information Office, N.E.H., 1100 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20506; (202) 606-8443.
  • March 15--Cartooning: Entries are due for the 1994 Student Editorial Cartoon Contest, sponsored by NewsCurrents magazine. Students in grades K-12 are invited to submit original cartoons on any subject of nationwide interest. Twenty-one winners will receive savings bonds ranging from $50 to $100. Contact: N.C. Magazine, P.O. Box 52, Madison, Wis. 53701; (800) 356-2303 or (608) 836-6660.
  • March 15--Drug-abuse prevention: Registration is due for the "Murals Reflecting Prevention'' program, sponsored by Learning Systems Group and Very Special Arts. Participating teachers of students in grades 1-12 will receive free educational materials including a project packet and video, featuring age-appropriate information on alcohol, tobacco, and other drug education, as well as suggestions for creating portable or traditional wall murals. Contact: L.S.G./V.S.A., 1331 F St., N.W., Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20004; (202) 628-8080; TDD: (202) 737-0645.


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