Published Online:
Published in Print: September 4, 1991, as Legislative Update

Legislative Update

Article Tools
  • PrintPrinter-Friendly
  • EmailEmail Article
  • ReprintReprints
  • CommentsComments

The following are summaries of final action by legislatures on education-related matters.

INDIANA
Governor: Evan Bayh (D)
FY 1992-93 state budget: $14.8 billion
FY 1992-93 K-12 budget: $5.2 billion
FY 1990-91 K-12 budget: $4.8 billion
Percent change K-12 budget: + 8.2 percent

Highlights:

  • Legislature approved an increase in basic school aid of 4 percent in the first year and 3 percent in the second year, funded by suspension of an automobile excise-tax cut and by assuming increases in local property taxes; also makes available about $55 million from "rainy day" fund.
  • Also allocated $3.5 million a year for "Stepahead" program to coordinate services for at-risk preschoolers.
  • Approved scaled-down school-restructuring measure allowing each district to designate schools for a pilot program granting waivers from some state regulations.
  • Created new office consolidating employment and training, vocational education, and workforce literacy, but turned down Governor's workforce-development proposal.

NEVADA

Governor: Bob Miller (D)
FY 1992 state budget: $989.5 million
FY 1992 K-12 budget: $344.6 million
FY 1991 K-12 budget: $337.3 million
Percent change K- 12 budget: + 2.2 percent

Highlights:

  • Legislature went beyond Governor's request for class-size reduction for 2nd and 3rd grades, from 26 to 1 to 16 to 1 by 1993. Governor had requested a ratio of 19 to 1.
  • Request for teacher pay increase delayed until Oct. 1, instead of going into effect in July, but could be retroactively restored if state revenues improve.
  • Funding provided for Governor's package aimed at criminal street gangs, and local school districts have been authorized to levy an added tax for security measures.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Governor: Judd Gregg (R)
FY 1992 state budget: $671.2 million
FY 1992 K-12 budget: $85.4 million
FY 1991 K-12 budget: $83.1 million
Percent change K-12 budget: + 2.7 percent

Highlights:

  • Legislature allocated funds for performance-assessment planning for 3rd-grade mathematics and reading.
  • Proposals fostering school choice, including private and religious schools, were defeated in legislature, as was a bill establishing a state income tax.

OKLAHOMA

Governor: David Walters (D)
FY 1992 state budget: $3.44 billion
FY 1992 K-12 budget: $1.2 billion
FY 1991 K-12 budget: $1.07 billion
Percent change K-12 budget: + 11.6 percent

Highlights:

  • Governor signed bill establishing an alternative-certification program to allow professionals to become teachers without a teaching credential.
  • Also approved measure establishing state oversight of a cash-management program used by school districts and increasing criminal penalties for district officials who exceed the district's budget.
  • Governor has scheduled Oct. 15 referendum on repeal of school-reform and tax-increase law passed by legislature last year.

PENNSYLVANIA

Governor: Robert P. Casey (D)
FY 1992 state budget: $13.9 billion
FY 1992 K-12 budget: $2.9 billion
FY 1991 K-12 budget: $2.7 billion
Percent change K-12 budget: + 7.2 percent

Highlights:

  • Legislature approved a $332-million increase in basic state aid to schools and state aid for special education.
  • Set aside another $20 million for the state's poorest school districts.
  • Approved Governor's proposal for a new funding formula for special education that is designed to control rising costs.

WISCONSIN

Governor: Tommy G. Thompson (R)
FY 1992 state budget: $6.7 billion
FY 1992 K-12 budget: $1.95 billion
FY 1991 K-12 budget: $1.86 billion
Percent change K-12 budget: + 4.8 percent

Highlights:

  • Governor used a record 457 line-item vetoes to create his own property-tax-relief plan and revive a proposal, rejected by legislators, to authorize incentives for teenagers on welfare to marry. He also vetoed the bulk of funding for 1993 in order to force lawmakers to reconsider that budget in January.
  • Tax-relief plan expands or creates tax credits for property owners equal to a proportion of the amount of local school-district taxes owed.
  • The tax credits, plus increases in state education aid, bring the state's share of public-school expenditures to more than half for the first time.
  • Also approved were bills to require a uniform report card on schools in every district and allow high-school students to take for-credit courses at postsecondary schools for free.

Vol. 11, Issue 01, Page 1

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Login | Register
Ground Rules for Posting
We encourage lively debate, but please be respectful of others. Profanity and personal attacks are prohibited. By commenting, you are agreeing to abide by our user agreement.
All comments are public.

Back to Top Back to Top

Most Popular Stories

Viewed

Emailed

Recommended

Commented