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Column One: Students

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Students across the country will soon be able to take advantage of an unusual school-based martial-arts program, under plans unveiled last month by a Washington, D.C.-area martial-arts instructor.

The "Joy of Discipline" program, which has been in place since 1989 in three area schools, is aimed at enhancing student discipline and self-esteem through instruction in the Korean art of Tae Kwon Do.

This year, according to the instructor, Jhoon Rhee, the program will be offered in eight additional schools in the Washington area. It is also expected to expand to schools in Chelsea, Mass., as well as other large cities across the country, Mr. Rhee said.

Mr. Rhee also said he traveled last month to Moscow, where he helped introduce the Tae Kwon Do program in Soviet schools.


SUBJ:
Column One: Students

Education Week
Volume 10, Issue 23, February 27, 1991, p 6

Copyright 1991, Editorial Projects in Education, Inc.

Column One: Students

The Baltimore city schools and the University of Maryland at Baltimore have established a "homework center" at a middle school in an effort to help children with academic difficulties.

The center, located in the school's library and open three days a week, provides 6th graders an opportunity to get additional help from university faculty members and graduate students who volunteer at the school, according to Ruth Bukatman, principal of the Booker T. Washington Middle School.

"We're hoping to help kids develop good habits in getting homework done," she said. "If they are in the habit when they're little guys, they'll keep at it."

Ms. Bukatman said more than 20 students have already signed up, and other parents have asked to have their children enrolled.


SUBJ:
Column One: Students

Education Week
Volume 10, Issue 23, February 27, 1991, p 6

Copyright 1991, Editorial Projects in Education, Inc.

Column One: Students

Despite the appeal of sports stars and celebrities, 4th graders' "real heroes" are their parents and teachers, a survey of some 21,000 inner-city children has found.

Asked to complete the statement, "Alan Page is great, but my real hero is ...," more than a fourth of all students named their mother, father, or parents as their heroes, while 6 percent--the next largest group--named their teachers.

Fewer than 4 percent identified as their heroes such stars as Bo Jackson, Joe Montana, and Michael Jordan, the survey found. Others--including Madonna, Bart Simpson, and the ever-popular Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles--were barely mentioned.

The survey was conducted as part of an essay contest, sponsored by the Eastman Kodak Company and led by Mr. Page, the former professional football star, aimed at encouraging inner-city youths to stay in school. Participants are asked to write essays on the importance of education.--rr

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