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Philanthropy Column

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The Toyota Motor Corporation has awarded the Kentucky-based National Center for Family Literacy a $2-million grant to expand its highly touted literacy program to five additional cities.

The contribution was one of the largest corporate grants ncfl has received since its inception in 1989. Toyota's interest is part of an ongoing campaign to support education organizations in Kentucky, where it opened an automobile plant in 1989.

The organization develops in-school adult-literacy, general-equivalency, and preschool programs so disadvantaged families can participate in the education process together. Studies show undereducated parents are hard-pressed to provide a learning atmosphere for their children, but children who see their parents striving for academic achievement are more likely to follow suit.

The five new programs will be unveiled March 19. Ncfl currently operates in 50 large cities and small towns in 23 states.


SUBJ:
Philanthropy Column

Education Week
Volume 10, Issue 23, February 27, 1991, p 9

Copyright 1991, Editorial Projects in Education, Inc.

Philanthropy Column

Forty innovative schools from 20 states were selected last month as finalists for the rjr Nabisco Foundation's "Next Century Program," a two-year-old project that provides grants of up to $750,000 to encourage bold education-reform proposals.

The finalists--chosen from 1,600 applicants--outlined plans for expanded school years, heightened parental and community involvement, early intervention, and curriculum reform. The winners will be chosen in April.

"The main obstacle to improving education is ... the inability of an organization as large and entrenched as the school systems are to really encourage and embrace reform," said Tracey Riese, vice president for corporate communications at the rjr Nabisco Corporation.

Last year, 15 winners shared grants totaling $8.5 million. They included Davis Elementary School in Portland, Ore., which began a program called "Recess Math" to teach children and parents mathematics skills through game-playing; and Stanley Elementary School in Kansas City, Kan., which keeps teachers and students together in three-year blocs and in expanded school days and school years to help bond educational relationships.


SUBJ:
Philanthropy Column

Education Week
Volume 10, Issue 23, February 27, 1991, p 9

Copyright 1991, Editorial Projects in Education, Inc.

Philanthropy Column

Two Chicago companies became the guardian angels of 23 disadvantaged 7th graders last month, pledging $360,000 over the next six years to get the students through high school and beyond.

Inland Steel Industries Inc. and Arrow Lumber Company will provide a full-time social worker, employee mentors, supplies, summer jobs, and possibly college scholarships to one class at Plamondon Elementary School on Chicago's Southwest Side.

--jw

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