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Legislative Update

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The following are summaries of governors' budget requests for precollegiate education and related highlights of their legislative agendas. Final action by lawmakers will be reported in the months ahead.


MASSACHUSETTS


Governor:

Michael S. Dukakis (D)

FY 1989 proposed state budget:

$12 billion

FY 1989 proposed K-12 budget:

$1.76 billion

FY 1988 K-12 budget:

$1.71 billion

Percent change K-12 budget:

+3 percent


Highlights


$33-million increase for "equal opportunity" grants to poorer districts.

New employment and training program. Includes $18.6 million in day-care services to enable single parents to enter the workforce; an $800,000 expansion of the "Commonwealth Futures" dropout-prevention program; and $600,000 for 20 new adult-basic-education centers.

Proposes a college-savings plan that would allow parents to buy bonds guaranteeing a percentage of tuition at the state's public and private colleges and universities.

Plans to seek an additional $30- million later in this session to fund reforms approved in 1987.


MICHIGAN


Governor:

James J. Blanchard (D)

FY 1989 proposed state budget:

$11.6 billion

FY 1989 proposed K-12 budget:

$2.95 billion

FY 1988 K-12 budget:

$2.7 billion

Percent change K-12 budget:

+9 percent


Highlights


Says legislature must enact far-ranging set of reform proposals before he will consider measure to re4structure school-finance system.

Will veto state-aid bill if it fails to include funds for new preschool initiative for at-risk 4-year-olds. Seeking $40 million in 1989, $60 million in 1990, and $80 million in 1991.

$170 million in "quality assurance" funds. Districts could receive aid by adopting core curriculum; raising promotion and graduation standards; lowering K-3 pupil-teacher ratios; expanding parental "choice"; and adopting school-based improvement plans.

$5 million in incentive funds for districts that raise students' scores on state tests.


MISSISSIPPI


Governor:

Ray Mabus (D)

FY 1989 proposed state budget:

$1.8 billion

FY 1989 proposed K-12 budget:

$731 million

FY 1988 K-12 budget:

$622.3 million

Percent change K-12 budget:

+17 percent


Highlights


$114 million to increase teacher salaries by an average of $3,700.

$66-million aid hike for four-year colleges and universities; $18-million increase for two-year junior colleges.


NEVADA


Governor:

Richard H. Bryan (D)

FY 1988-89 state budget:

$3 billion (approved June 1987)

FY 1988-89 K-12 budget:

$452 million


Highlights


Legislature not in session this year.

Declares 1988 the "Year of the Library" to stress literacy programs.

Recommends that lawmakers next year consolidate social-service agencies aiding victims of child abuse.


OREGON


Governor:

Neil Goldschmidt (D)

FY 1988-89 state budget:

$3.7 billion (approved June 1987)

FY 1988-89 K-12 budget:

$1.2 billion


Highlights


Legislature not in session this year.

Expects panel he created to study changes in school-finance system to issue report by end of summer.


TENNESSEE


Governor:

Ned Ray McWherter (D)

FY 1989 proposed state budget:

$5.7 billion

FY 1989 proposed K-12 budget:

$1.33 billion

FY 1988 K-12 budget:

$1.22 billion

Percent change K-12 budget:

+9 percent


Highlights


$83 million to raise minimum starting salary for teachers from $15,350 to $16,925 and provide veteran teachers with a $1,575 raise.

Seeks legislation authorizing public schools to operate day-care centers.


WISCONSIN


Governor:

Tommy Thompson (R)

FY 1989 proposed state budget:

$8.1 billion

FY 1989 proposed K-12 budget:

$1.67 billion

FY 1988 K-12 budget:

$1.53 billion

Percent change K-12 budget:

+9 percent


Highlights


Seeks pilot "parental choice" plan for at-risk pupils in Milwaukee.

$3 million in aid to disadvantaged students in Milwaukee required as part of a school-desegregation settlement reached last year.

Urges raising compulsory school-attendance age to 18.

Proposes a new school-aid formula. Would raise state's share of education costs from 46.5 percent to 57 percent over two years and require districts to temporarily freeze current spending and property-tax rates.

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