Classroom Technology Collection

E-Learning

Markets Picking and Choosing Digital Content
Technology is changing the way schools go about crafting curricula and purchasing content, prompting publishers to rethink how they do business.
Katie Ash, February 8, 2012
6 min read
Kelsey Stephenson works on an online course from her kitchen after school. Her district, the Putnam County, Tenn., schools, requires that students take at least one online course to graduate.
Kelsey Stephenson works on an online course from her kitchen after school. Her district, the Putnam County, Tenn., schools, requires that students take at least one online course to graduate.
Shawn Poynter for Digital Directions
Law & Courts States, Districts Move to Require Virtual Classes
But the new graduation requirements raise concerns about the equity of access to online learning tools and the technological costs of supporting such measures.
Michelle R. Davis, October 17, 2011
6 min read
GOAL Academy academic coach April Stephen sends a text message to a student while she works at a recruiting booth for the online school, one of the state’s newest and largest online programs, at the Denver County Fair earlier this year.
GOAL Academy academic coach April Stephen sends a text message to a student while she works at a recruiting booth for the online school, one of the state’s newest and largest online programs, at the Denver County Fair earlier this year.
Joe Mahoney/I-News Network
Classroom Technology Test Scores Raise Questions About Colo. Virtual Schools
An independent analysis of previously unreleased online school data reveals key new findings and an achievement gap that alarmed education officials.
Burt Hubbard, I-News Network & Nancy Mitchell, Education News Colorado, October 5, 2011
8 min read
Law & Courts Fla. E-Learning Mandate Puts Financial Strain on Districts
The new law requires incoming freshman, beginning this school year, to take at least one course online prior to graduation.
Marc Valero, September 20, 2011
3 min read
Law & Courts Idaho Ed. Board Votes to Require Online Classes
The state board of education gave initial approval to a rule requiring high school students to take at least two credits online to graduate.
Sean Cavanagh, September 20, 2011
2 min read
Tessa Falcetta, a rising 8th grader who lives in Grove City, Pa., has taken online classes in the past and will be taking them again when she starts school in the fall. Tessa has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, dysgraphia, and general anxiety disorder.
Tessa Falcetta, a rising 8th grader who lives in Grove City, Pa., has taken online classes in the past and will be taking them again when she starts school in the fall. Tessa has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, dysgraphia, and general anxiety disorder.
Jason Cohn for Education Week
Special Education E-Learning Expands for Special-Needs Students
But obstacles to greater participation remain, and questions persist about what works best for students with disabilities.
August 22, 2011
11 min read
Federal Opportunity Ripe For Online ELL Ed.
English-language learners remain underenrolled in virtual-learning programs, despite the prospect of such benefits as self-paced study and an adaptive curriculum.
Ian Quillen, August 22, 2011
6 min read
School & District Management Tracking the Pace of E-Learning
The 2010 "Keeping Pace with K-12 Online Learning" report breaks down the state of e-learning in the U.S.
Katie Ash, June 15, 2011
1 min read
Freshman Yana Failor works on her laptop at San Francisco Flex Academy, a hybrid charter high school where students are offered Web-based curriculum and face-to-face instruction.
Freshman Yana Failor works on her laptop at San Francisco Flex Academy, a hybrid charter high school where students are offered Web-based curriculum and face-to-face instruction.
Ramin Rahimian for Digital Directions
Classroom Technology 'Hybrid' Charter Schools on the Rise
Loosely based on the idea of combining face-to-face education with online instruction, the blended model of schooling is growing in popularity.
Michelle R. Davis, June 15, 2011
8 min read
Jennifer Sloan, a 4th grade student at Summit View Elementary School in Independence, Ky. uses an iPad during a lesson. The northern Kentucky elementary school class received $30,000-worth of the tablet computing devices in late 2010 from the Duke Energy Corporation, for use in math and science assignments.
Jennifer Sloan, a 4th grade student at Summit View Elementary School in Independence, Ky. uses an iPad during a lesson. The northern Kentucky elementary school class received $30,000-worth of the tablet computing devices in late 2010 from the Duke Energy Corporation, for use in math and science assignments.
Amanda Davidson/The Cincinnati Enquirer/AP
Classroom Technology Educators Evaluate Learning Benefits of iPad
In the wake of the iPad 2 release, teachers are still determining best practices for the different versions of the tablet computing device.
Ian Quillen, June 15, 2011
7 min read
During an informal “campfire chat” on the ISTE Second Life Island, participants discuss the themes from a series of virtual speaker presentations.
During an informal “campfire chat” on the ISTE Second Life Island, participants discuss the themes from a series of virtual speaker presentations.
Courtesy of ISTE
IT Infrastructure 'Second Life' Struggles to Catch On With Educators
The amount of training required to become proficient with "Second Life" has discouraged many educators from using it for professional development.
Katie Ash, June 15, 2011
8 min read
BRIC ARCHIVE
Courtesy of EDC/Center for Children and Technology
Science Programming Digital Fun Into Science Education
Despite a lack of hard-hitting research linking video games and simulations to learning gains, educators are showing increasing interest in using them to teach.
Katie Ash, June 15, 2011
7 min read
Teacher Karyn Hall celebrates after a student completes a lesson in the computer lab at Hillcrest Elementary School in Chattanooga, Tenn., during a summer learning session that uses computers to help students retain more of what they learned. Summer educators across the country are seeing the use of technology as a promising strategy for keeping students engaged in learning and sharpening academic skills.
Teacher Karyn Hall celebrates after a student completes a lesson in the computer lab at Hillcrest Elementary School in Chattanooga, Tenn., during a summer learning session that uses computers to help students retain more of what they learned. Summer educators across the country are seeing the use of technology as a promising strategy for keeping students engaged in learning and sharpening academic skills.
Shawn Poynter/Education Week
Classroom Technology Summer Educators 'Mix Up' Learning with Technology
Summer programs are harnessing technology to try to improve students' academic proficiency.
Ian Quillen, June 14, 2011
4 min read
HISTORY COLLABORATION: In Ken Halla’s Advanced Placement U.S. Government class at Hayfield Secondary School in Fairfax County, Va., students use netbooks to work on a federal budget project.
HISTORY COLLABORATION: In Ken Halla’s Advanced Placement U.S. Government class at Hayfield Secondary School in Fairfax County, Va., students use netbooks to work on a federal budget project.
Nicole Fruge for Education Week
Curriculum Digitized Historical Documents Give Students Direct Access to the Past
Students can now review thousands of perspectives from key historical figures faster and more easily than ever before.
Katie Ash, June 13, 2011
8 min read