Curriculum

Teachers Go ‘Idol’

By Elizabeth Rich — June 01, 2010 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

On Wednesday, Harlem’s Apollo Theater—where the Jackson 5, Stevie Wonder, and Billie Holiday once performed—will host New York City’s first Teachers’ Night! as part of its Amateur Night series, reports the New York Times. Seventeen teacher acts are expected to perform in an event where, according to Apollo tradition, the audience will determine who lives and who dies on the stage.

Among the acts will be a self-described “explosive” hula hooper who has performed in Las Vegas and Off Broadway, a band called the Suspensions (rejected names included the Hall Passes and Detention), as well as comedians, poets, and musicians.

Jesse Miller, a 61-year-old high school guitar teacher, said, “For me it’s important to establish for my students that I can actually do this thing that they’re sitting in my classroom about to learn.” Miller will perform Willie Dixon’s “I’m Ready.”

For hula hooper Anna McHugh, 32, performing provides her with an outlet outside of the classroom. “It can be kind of limiting or stifling to be a classroom teacher,” she said.

Marion J. Caffey, the show’s executive producer, noted that not every teacher audition was performance worthy. “We saw close to 100 people. Most of them were bad.”

“I think they’re very brave for doing this. It’s going to be terrible if they get booed off,” said Caffey, alluding to the tap-dancing “executioner” who pulls the rejected performers off the stage. “You would die for that to happen to your 7th grade teacher that you didn’t like if you were a student.”

The three acts that get the loudest applause from the 1,500-member audience will compete against other Apollo Amateur Night winners for the ultimate prize of being discovered.

Update: The New York Times reports today on Wednesday’s Teacher Night! at the Apollo. As expected, some teachers did better than others.

The evening’s winner was 28-year-old vocal music teacher Darryl Jordan who sang “Ordinary People” by John Legend. Jordan said he wouldn’t be quitting his day job any time soon. “I will always do [music] on the side. I do love teaching. I love passing on what I’ve learned.”

Related Tags:

A version of this news article first appeared in the Teaching Now blog.


Commenting has been disabled on edweek.org effective Sept. 8. Please visit our FAQ section for more details. To get in touch with us visit our contact page, follow us on social media, or submit a Letter to the Editor.


Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
What’s Next for Teaching and Learning? Key Trends for the New School Year
The past 18 months changed the face of education forever, leaving teachers, students, and families to adapt to unprecedented challenges in teaching and learning. As we enter the third school year affected by the pandemic—and
Content provided by Instructure
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Webinar
How Data and Digital Curriculum Can Drive Personalized Instruction
As we return from an abnormal year, it’s an educator’s top priority to make sure the lessons learned under adversity positively impact students during the new school year. Digital curriculum has emerged from the pandemic
Content provided by Kiddom
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Equity & Diversity Webinar
Leadership for Racial Equity in Schools and Beyond
While the COVID-19 pandemic continues to reveal systemic racial disparities in educational opportunity, there are revelations to which we can and must respond. Through conscientious efforts, using an intentional focus on race, school leaders can
Content provided by Corwin

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Curriculum What's the Best Way to Address Unfinished Learning? It's Not Remediation, Study Says
A new study suggests acceleration may be a promising strategy for addressing unfinished learning in math after a pandemic year.
5 min read
Female high school student running on the stairs leads to an opportunity to success
CreativaImages/iStock/Getty Images Plus
Curriculum School Halts Use of Fictional Book in Which Officer Kills a Black Child
Fifth graders in at least one Broward County school were assigned to read a book that critics say casts police officers as racist liars.
Rafael Olmeda, South Florida Sun-Sentinel
5 min read
Broward County School Board member Lori Alhadeff listens during a meeting of the Broward County School Board, Tuesday, March 5, 2019, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Broward County School Board member Lori Alhadeff listens during a meeting of the Broward County School Board in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Alhadeff told the South Florida Sun-Sentinel that she does not feel like the book "Ghost Boys" is appropriate for 5th graders.
Lynne Sladky/AP
Curriculum Opinion Introducing Primary Sources to Students
Five educators share strategies for introducing primary sources to students, including English-language learners.
12 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty
Curriculum Opinion Eight Ways to Teach With Primary Sources
Four educators share ways they use primary sources with students, including a strategy called "Zoom."
13 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty