Curriculum

Teacher Job Market Shows Slight Gains, Survey Finds

By Vaishali Honawar — April 25, 2006 1 min read

The job market for teachers improved slightly in 2005, for the second consecutive year, but colleges of education say the mandate for “highly qualified” teachers under the federal No Child Left Behind Act could result in a drop in the supply.

The findings were reported in an annual survey of the deans, directors, and career-center directors of more than 1,200 teacher colleges, conducted by the American Association for Employment in Education, a Columbus, Ohio-based research and advocacy group.

Of the 64 fields in which the colleges offer programs, 29 are reported to be in some degree of shortage, the survey found, while 32 reflected an increase in demand from the previous year. Eight of the top 10 shortage fields are in special education. For the 10th consecutive year, no fields are reported as having a big surplus. The shortages and surpluses vary by geography and discipline.

B. J. Bryant, the executive director of the AAEE, said the improving economy in 2004-05 meant school districts were more willing and able to hire.

Still, she added, candidates coming out of teacher education programs can find it daunting to satisfy all the state and federal mandates.

“They have to make sure they’re meeting ‘highly qualified’ standards, apply for licensure, and take a competency test, among other things,” she said. “That’s a lot of hoops to jump through.”

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Recruitment & Retention Webinar
Recruiting and Retaining a More Diverse Teaching Workforce
We discuss the importance of workforce diversity and learn strategies to recruit and retain teachers from diverse backgrounds.
Content provided by EdWeek Top School Jobs
Student Well-Being Webinar Boosting Teacher and Student Motivation During the Pandemic: What It Takes
Join Alyson Klein and her expert guests for practical tips and discussion on how to keep students and teachers motivated as the pandemic drags on.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
A Holistic Approach to Social-Emotional Learning
Register to learn about the components and benefits of holistically implemented SEL.
Content provided by Committee for Children

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Principal
Meredith, New Hampshire
Inter-Lakes School District
Elementary Principal
Washington State
Wenatchee School District
Principal
Meredith, New Hampshire
Inter-Lakes School District
Elementary Principal
Washington State
Wenatchee School District

Read Next

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Whitepaper
Survey: Increased ebook usage & value amid COVID-19
With COVID-19 altering nearly all aspects of daily life, including the way students learn, this survey sought insight from those on the f...
Content provided by OverDrive
Curriculum Opinion Ian Rowe Discusses 1776 Unites and His Efforts to Promote a Vision of a Unified America
Ian Rowe, co-founder of 1776 Unites, discusses the initiative and its efforts to promote pathways to opportunity for Americans of all races.
7 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
Curriculum From ‘Stunning’ to ‘Surprising’: How News of the Capitol Attack Was Repackaged for Schools
Experts criticized ed-tech company Newsela for sugarcoating the violent insurrection when it adapted an Associated Press story for schools.
6 min read
A man dressed as George Washington and holding a Trump flag kneels and prays near the Washington Monument on Jan. 6.
A man dressed as George Washington and holding a Trump flag kneels and prays near the Washington Monument on Jan. 6.
Carolyn Kaster/AP
Curriculum 6 Ways to Help Students Make Sense of the Capitol Siege
A week after the attack on the U.S. Capitol, teachers are helping students figure out how the country got to this point.
15 min read
Image of the Capitol building shown in a rearview mirror.
Macrocosm Photography/E+