Assessment

Survey: Impact of So-Called ‘High Stakes’ Tests Actually Low

By Lillian Mongeau, Emmanuel Felton, Sarah Butrymowicz & The Hechinger Report — May 06, 2015 4 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

It turns out that the stakes for this spring’s common-core-aligned tests are not quite as high as they might seem.

The Hechinger Report surveyed the District of Columbia and all 44 states* that have adopted the common core and will be administering a common-core-aligned test this spring to find out how they plan to use test scores. We found that very few states will be using this spring’s scores for any student-related decisions. And the stakes for teachers are only slightly higher.

“I think the stakes are either overstated or understated depending on which side of the argument you’re on,” said Chris Minnich, executive director of the Council of Chief State School Officers. “Both sides need to take a step back and just take a look at this map.”

Minnich inspired us to create the map when he urged reporters at an Education Writers Association conference on the common core to find out exactly how much the results of this spring’s exams will affect students and teachers.

The answer? Not so much.

Maps: How High Are the Stakes?

Three states will use the test scores as some portion of a graduation requirement. Ohio has developed its own common-core-aligned test that all students must pass as either juniors or seniors. Florida is requiring sophomores to successfully pass an aligned English test and an Algebra I test. And Washington State is allowing juniors to use their scores on the test developed by testing consortium Smarter Balanced to show proficiency, but students can also use scores from the state’s old exam or from end-of-course tests in certain subjects.

Thirty-five states have no exit exam at all and seven have exit exams of some other kind – end-of-course tests, New York’s Regents tests, California’s CAHSEE, a civics exam, etc. – but will not be using a sole test score to allow seniors to graduate or not. Nine states are considering using scores on standardized common-core-aligned tests in the future, but plans vary greatly as to how much weight scores will receive.

This story was produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news website focused on inequality and innovation in education.

Only three states will be using this spring’s common-core-aligned test to regulate grade promotion: Florida, Mississippi and Wisconsin. Of those, only Mississippi is using a single test score in isolation, though even then it’s not one of the much-discussed new standardized tests developed for common core. Mississippi will use students’ reading scores on a state-developed reading test (MKAS) to determine whether or not they will go on to 4th grade.

For teachers, it’s a slightly different story. Thirty-four states plan to use test scores for some portion of teacher evaluations either this year or in the future. Still, only 13 states will use this spring’s scores in some way and most of those will use the scores as a baseline for student growth between this year and next.

Of the 21 states that plan to use the tests as part of teacher evaluations in the future, many have already specified that the score will count for only a percentage of the evaluation. For example, Wyoming plans to use test scores as 20 percent of teacher evaluations starting in 2020.

Minnich, who describes himself as part of the “moderate middle” on testing and common core, said that the important message for students was that while the tests are important for adults to know how a class is doing, there’s no need to stress about the results. He admitted that the task of finding the right balance in delivering that message is not easy.

As for teachers, Minnich hopes that they can continue to be part of an ongoing conversation about the best way to use measures of student learning in evaluations. He said his members – the country’s state superintendents – were more or less in agreement on the benefit of using scores as one of several teacher performance measures.

All of which is to say, yes, the tests are important. Decisions will be made based on how students perform on them. But the vast majority of states will use the scores only as one measure in a web of other factors when making staffing decisions. And most states have no plans to use the scores to make student advancement decisions.

*We included Pennsylvania, which adopted the common core in 2010 but has since made modifications to those standards, in our survey.

Maps: How High Are the Stakes?

Source: The Hechinger Report

Note From The Hechinger Report Regarding Maps: The maps above depict the reality only for decisions that will (or will not) be made using this spring’s test scores. In several cases there is a complex answer to that question. We have included additional information about some states in the notes when needed. Also, we acknowledge that every state has many individual variations on how and how much it is considering test scores. Everything from local politics to the strength of statewide unions to parent engagement inform the strength and direction of the discussions happening in each state. In many cases, local districts also have the ability to set their own policies, which may include higher stakes than mandated by the state. As a result, most policies are confusing and evolving. To keep our maps accurate, we kept our questions very narrow and only included current statewide policy, not local district policy. Finally, we also did not attempt to capture the stakes schools may or may not face based on federal regulations. We stuck to the stakes for teachers and students as mandated by states.

A version of this article appeared in the May 13, 2015 edition of Education Week

Events

Teaching Webinar Examining the Evidence: What We’re Learning From the Field About Implementing High-Dosage Tutoring Programs
Tutoring programs have become a leading strategy to address COVID-19 learning loss. What evidence-based principles can district and school leaders draw on to design, implement, measure, and improve high-quality tutoring programs? And what are districts
Classroom Technology Webinar Building Better Blended Learning in K-12 Schools
The pandemic and the increasing use of technology in K-12 education it prompted has added renewed energy to the blended learning movement as most students are now learning in school buildings (and will likely continue

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Assessment State Test Results Are In. Are They Useless?
While states, districts, and schools pore over data from spring 2021 tests, experts urge caution over how to interpret and use the results.
9 min read
FILE - In this Jan. 17, 2016 file photo, a sign is seen at the entrance to a hall for a college test preparation class in Bethesda, Md. The $380 million test coaching industry is facing competition from free or low-cost alternatives in what their founders hope will make the process of applying to college more equitable. Such innovations are also raising questions about the relevance and the fairness of relying on standardized tests in admissions process.
A sign is posted at the entrance to a hall for a test-preparation class. Assessment experts say educators should use data from spring 2021 tests with caution.
Alex Brandon/AP
Assessment Data Young Adolescents' Scores Trended to Historic Lows on National Tests. And That's Before COVID Hit
The past decade saw unprecedented declines in the National Assessment of Educational Progress's longitudinal study.
3 min read
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Assessment Whitepaper
Proven Techniques for Assessing Students with Technology
Dr. Doug Fisher’s proven assessment techniques help your students become active learners and increase their chances for higher learning g...
Content provided by Achieve3000
Assessment Long a Testing Bastion, Florida Plans to End 'Outdated' Year-End Exams
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said the state will shift to "progress monitoring" starting in the 2022-23 school year.
5 min read
Florida Governor Ron DeSantis speaks at the opening of a monoclonal antibody site in Pembroke Pines, Fla., on Aug. 18, 2021.
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said he believes a new testing regimen is needed to replace the Florida Standards Assessment, which has been given since 2015.
Marta Lavandier/AP