Curriculum

States Have Adopted Dozens of Policies to Support Computer Science Education, Report Finds

By Alyson Klein — September 11, 2019 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

It’s no secret computer science education is seen as one of smartest ways to prepare students for the future of work.

And in the last 12 months, 33 states have adopted a total of 57 policies to support computer science education, according to a report out today from the nonprofits including Code.org, the Computer Science Teachers Association, and the Expanding Computing Education Pathways Alliance. For instance:


  • Alabama set a timeline by which every middle and high school would be required to offer basics in computer science and computational thinking.
  • Connecticut required all teacher preparation programs to include instruction in computer science.
  • Indiana adopted a state computer science plan, made changes to computer science standards and curriculum and is appropriating $3 million to the subject.

Despite all that activity, across 39 states, only 45 percent of high schools teach computer science. And students receiving free and reduced-price lunch and those from rural areas are less likely to have access to those courses, the report found.

Code.org recommends states:


  • Create a plan for K-12 computer science;
  • Establish standards for K-12 computer science education;
  • Allocate funding for computer science professional learning;
  • Implement certification pathways for computer science teachers;
  • Create post-secondary programs to offer pre-service training to teachers;
  • Establish dedicated computer science positions at the district and state levels;
  • Require that all secondary schools offer computer science; and
  • Consider making computer science both a core graduation requirement for high schoolers and an admissions requirement for state postsecondary institutions.

For now, most states don’t meet all those recommendations, although some are adopting them at a quick rate. Right now, for instance, just 19 states make it a requirement for all high schools to offer computer science. That’s a big uptick though, from 2017, when just four states required those courses. And 34 states have adopted K-12 computer science standards, a major jump from 6 states in 2017.

Image: Getty


Related Tags:

A version of this news article first appeared in the Digital Education blog.


Commenting has been disabled on edweek.org effective Sept. 8. Please visit our FAQ section for more details. To get in touch with us visit our contact page, follow us on social media, or submit a Letter to the Editor.


Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
6 Key Trends in Teaching and Learning
As we enter the third school year affected by the pandemic—and a return to the classroom for many—we come better prepared, but questions remain. How will the last year impact teaching and learning this school
Content provided by Instructure
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Equity & Diversity Webinar
Leadership for Racial Equity in Schools and Beyond
While the COVID-19 pandemic continues to reveal systemic racial disparities in educational opportunity, there are revelations to which we can and must respond. Through conscientious efforts, using an intentional focus on race, school leaders can
Content provided by Corwin
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Equity & Diversity Webinar
Evaluating Equity to Drive District-Wide Action this School Year
Educational leaders are charged with ensuring all students receive equitable access to a high-quality education. Yet equity is more than an action. It is a lens through which we continuously review instructional practices and student
Content provided by BetterLesson

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Curriculum What's the Best Way to Address Unfinished Learning? It's Not Remediation, Study Says
A new study suggests acceleration may be a promising strategy for addressing unfinished learning in math after a pandemic year.
5 min read
Female high school student running on the stairs leads to an opportunity to success
CreativaImages/iStock/Getty Images Plus
Curriculum School Halts Use of Fictional Book in Which Officer Kills a Black Child
Fifth graders in at least one Broward County school were assigned to read a book that critics say casts police officers as racist liars.
Rafael Olmeda, South Florida Sun-Sentinel
5 min read
Broward County School Board member Lori Alhadeff listens during a meeting of the Broward County School Board, Tuesday, March 5, 2019, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Broward County School Board member Lori Alhadeff listens during a meeting of the Broward County School Board in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Alhadeff told the South Florida Sun-Sentinel that she does not feel like the book "Ghost Boys" is appropriate for 5th graders.
Lynne Sladky/AP
Curriculum Opinion Introducing Primary Sources to Students
Five educators share strategies for introducing primary sources to students, including English-language learners.
12 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty
Curriculum Opinion Eight Ways to Teach With Primary Sources
Four educators share ways they use primary sources with students, including a strategy called "Zoom."
13 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty