Assessment

State Tests Don’t Support Good Instruction, Panel Says

By Michelle Galley — October 31, 2001 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

State-level accountability programs must be changed significantly so that they adequately support teaching and assessment, a report released last week by a commission of educators says.

“Building Tests to Support Instruction and Accountability,” from the National Education Association.

The state-mandated tests now being used are so insufficient they “are causing educational harm, perhaps irreparable harm, to thousands of American children,” W. James Popham, an emeritus professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the chairman of the Commission on Instructionally Supportive Assessment, argued at a press conference here.

In addition to Mr. Popham, the commission includes the leaders of the American Association of School Administrators, the National Association of Elementary School Principals, the National Association of Secondary School Principals, the National Education Association, and the National Middle Schools Association.

The nine recommendations outlined in the report set a framework for states to follow as they adjust their testing programs to answer President Bush’s call for annual testing of all students in grades 3-8 in reading and mathematics. That provision is included in both versions of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act reauthorization now being considered by a committee of Congress.

States need to set priorities for their standards and relay the most important standards in “educator-friendly descriptions,” so that teachers will be able to focus their instruction, the report says.

Teachers are often presented with large documents of standards and don’t know where to begin or what is crucial, Margaret E. Goertz, a professor of education at the University of Pennsylvania, said in an interview. “Whatever is on the assessment is what becomes important to teachers,” she said.

Showing teachers how to use test results to improve their instruction is also key, the report says. It adds that states need to provide educators with assessment tools that evaluate student progress on academic-content standards that state tests don’t cover. In addition, states should monitor curricula to make sure that those subject areas are being adequately taught, it says.

Testing the Testers

To make sure that states are providing assessments that meet the commission’s criteria, the panel plans to issue report cards on each state that grade how well their testing plans mesh with its framework.

“If educators are accountable for test results, policymakers need to be accountable for the quality of the assessments,” said Paul D. Houston, the executive director of the Washington-based AASA.

But because states can have a very different understandings of the recommendations, the commission needs to lay out more specifically what it is judging in each category, Ms. Goertz said. “I would suggest that before they go and issue a report card, they make clear what their criteria are for these requirements,” she said.

The state assessments in Connecticut stack up well against the report’s framework, said David H. Larson, the executive director of the Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents, an affiliate of the AASA.

But not everyone in Connecticut agrees that the state’s assessment program is on the right track.

Rosemary Coyle, the president of the Connecticut Education Association, an affiliate of the NEA, said that because teachers must focus so much time on preparing for the tests, they are forced to neglect subjects such as science and social studies that aren’t covered on the tests.

Related Tags:

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School Climate & Safety Webinar
Praise for Improvement: Supporting Student Behavior through Positive Feedback and Interventions
Discover how PBIS teams and educators use evidence-based practices for student success.
Content provided by Panorama Education
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
IT Management Webinar
Build a Digitally Responsive Educational Organization for Effective Digital-Age Learning
Chart a guided pathway to digital agility and build support for your organization’s mission and vision through dialogue and collaboration.
Content provided by Bluum
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Data Webinar
Drive Instruction With Mastery-Based Assessment
Deliver the right data at the right time—in the right format—and empower better decisions.
Content provided by Instructure

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Assessment Opinion What the Digital SAT Will Mean for Students and Educators
The college-admissions test will be fully digital by 2024. Priscilla Rodriguez from the College Board discusses the change.
6 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
Assessment Opinion Searching for Common Ground: What Makes a Good Test?
Rick Hess and USC Dean Pedro Noguera discuss standardized testing—what it’s for, where it’s gone wrong, and how to improve it.
5 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
Assessment Spotlight Spotlight on Assessment in 2022
This Spotlight will help you understand how to use assessment data to guide student learning and examine the debate over standardized tests.
Assessment State Test Results Are In. Are They Useless?
While states, districts, and schools pore over data from spring 2021 tests, experts urge caution over how to interpret and use the results.
9 min read
FILE - In this Jan. 17, 2016 file photo, a sign is seen at the entrance to a hall for a college test preparation class in Bethesda, Md. The $380 million test coaching industry is facing competition from free or low-cost alternatives in what their founders hope will make the process of applying to college more equitable. Such innovations are also raising questions about the relevance and the fairness of relying on standardized tests in admissions process.
A sign is posted at the entrance to a hall for a test-preparation class. Assessment experts say educators should use data from spring 2021 tests with caution.
Alex Brandon/AP