Reading & Literacy Report Roundup

Research Report: Reading

By Sarah D. Sparks — October 09, 2012 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

In order to learn to read, a young child’s brain must be developed enough to process the information, but still capable of fast growth, according to a longitudinal study published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Researchers at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., and Bar Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel, tracked the growth of reading skills and brain development in 55 children ages 7 to 12 over three years.

They found significant differences between the children who would eventually become above-average readers and those who became below-average readers in the level and net growth of white matter in brain areas associated with reading. White matter is the tissue that transmits signals from one region of the brain to another.

Researchers said the level of white matter in the poorer readers’ brains started out lower and shrank rather than grew over time, suggesting the children were not creating and strengthening those neural pathways.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the October 10, 2012 edition of Education Week as Reading

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Start Strong With Solid SEL Implementation: Success Strategies for the New School Year
Join Satchel Pulse to learn why implementing a solid SEL program at the beginning of the year will deliver maximum impact to your students.
Content provided by Satchel Pulse
Teaching Live Online Discussion Seat at the Table: How Can We Help Students Feel Connected to School?
Get strategies for your struggles with student engagement. Bring questions for our expert panel. Help students recover the joy of learning.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Science Webinar
Real-World Problem Solving: How Invention Education Drives Student Learning
Hear from student inventors and K-12 teachers about how invention education enhances learning, opens minds, and preps students for the future.
Content provided by The Lemelson Foundation

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Reading & Literacy Opinion No, Fewer Books, Less Writing Won't Add Up to Media Literacy
NCTE’s call to “decenter” print media in favor of digital media has some troubling implications, argues Mike Schmoker.
Mike Schmoker
4 min read
conceptual illustration of a stairway of books leading out of a dark space filled with letters
Vanessa Solis/Education Week and iStock/Getty images
Reading & Literacy Letter to the Editor Reading Recovery Debate Is ‘Polarizing’
The executive director of the Reading Recovery Community pushes back against criticism of the program.
1 min read
Illustration of an open laptop receiving an email.
iStock/Getty
Reading & Literacy What the Research Says Concerns Raised Over Reading Recovery's Long-Term Effects
The popular literacy intervention showed dramatic benefits for 1st graders, but follow-up research points to drawbacks years later.
5 min read
Image of a young boy selecting books in the library.
Getty