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Teaching Opinion

HQPBL Case Study: The Met School

By Tom Vander Ark — March 27, 2018 2 min read
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“Working on high quality projects is at the core of The Met... actually, I’d like to rephrase that and say doing real-world, meaningful work is at the core. Projects are the vehicle for how students at The Met get that done,” shared The Met Co-Founder Dennis Littky. Located in the heart of Providence, Rhode Island, The Met is part of the Big Picture Learning network and was designed based on the idea that students thrive when they are engaged in real-world work and are able to integrate internships tied to their passions into in-depth, integrated projects.

Listen as Taliq shares why high quality projects have been so transformative

Projects at The Met are connected to individual student goals, and each project includes specific skills students need to address. How does it work, exactly? Students are grouped in small cohorts (or essentially small communities), each with a bonding name like Unity or Liberty. Cohorts collaborate to tackle problems, support each other, and collaborate on projects.

The HQPBL (High Quality Project Based Learning) team was fortunate to talk to five Met students who all shared how powerful projects can be if they tap into student interests, are challenging and have a real purpose. Meet Jodiana, Mackendry, Taliq, Alan, Querida and Leeanna.

Listen as Leanna shares about how as part of one of her projects, she wrote a memorandum that was used in an actual course

Listen as Jodiana shares how she feels passionate about making sure each project she works on leaves a positive impact on the community

Advisors and mentors guide their work, but students really take most of the lead and initiative. Students work directly with college professors, local business leaders, and community members to initiate, plan, and execute their projects. They are project management machines!

Download the Case Study

Visit hqpbl.org for the full case study and more about the HQPBL campaign.

This blog is a part of the HQPBL Campaign supported by the Buck Institute for Education and sponsored by Project Management Institute Educational Foundation and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. For more, visit hqpbl.org and follow @hqpbl #hqpbl on Twitter and Instagram.

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