College & Workforce Readiness News in Brief

NCAA Raises GPA Bar for Freshman Athletes

By Bryan Toporek — November 01, 2011 1 min read
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High school athletes who hope to play sports in college will be held to a higher academic standard starting in 2015, under new rules approved by the NCAA’s Division I board of directors last week.

Currently, college freshmen need only a 2.0 grade point average to be eligible for competition. Under the new rules, student-athletes will need at least a 2.3 GPA to compete immediately. Those falling between 2.3 and 2.0 will be able to keep their athletic scholarships during an “academic redshirt” year, in which they are allowed to practice but can’t play.

Under the new rules, college prospects must successfully complete 10 of 16 required core classes before the start of their senior year in high school. Another change will link a college team’s postseason eligibility to its academic progress.

The board also agreed to allow an additional $2,000 in athletic-scholarship aid.

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A version of this article appeared in the November 02, 2011 edition of Education Week as NCAA Raises GPA Bar for Freshman Athletes

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