Curriculum

Legislation Aiming to Raise New Crop of W. Va. Hunters

By Katie Ash — February 19, 2008 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Faced with a drop in the number of state hunting licenses issued last year, West Virginia lawmakers have proposed a plan they hope will bolster interest in that activity and increase the revenue and fees it generates: hunter-training courses for middle and high schoolers.

The bill, which has passed the Senate education committee, was introduced by Sen. Billy Wayne Bailey and co-sponsored by Sen. Shirley Love, both Democrats.

“We wanted to … let people take [hunting] up as a sport and be safe in the woods,” said Sen. Bailey, whose proposal has drawn international attention.

Such programs are not uncommon in rural areas of the nation, said Francesca Zavacky, a senior program manager at the Reston, Va.-based National Association for Sport and Physical Education.

Kenneth S. Trump, the president of the Cleveland-based National School Safety and Security Services, said he can see the value of such courses.

“Certainly if the hunting aspect is a large part of the community values and norms, … it makes sense for the schools to cooperate with the broader community to promote the safety of children,” he said.

But the idea may not have as much appeal in urban communities. A Maryland law that would have required gun-safety training for students was vetoed by then-Gov. Parris N. Glendening in 2001. (“Md. Governor Vetoes Bill Requiring Schools To Teach Gun Safety,” May 23, 2001.)

See Also

See other stories on education issues in West Virginia. See data on West Virginia’s public school system.

Under the West Virginia proposal, the voluntary, two-week program would cover wildlife conservation, responsible and ethical hunting, basic hunting skills, firearm safety, and other topics.

Students would practice with guns that cannot discharge a bullet, said Sen. Bailey, who envisions the course for students in grades 8-12.

In West Virginia, residents who are at least 10 years old can obtain a valid hunting license after completing a 10-hour course and passing an exam.

“A lot of these courses are given in the evening in the fall of the year,” when many other extracurricular and academic activities are taking place, Sen. Bailey said. The proposed public school course would be taught during physical education classes.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the February 20, 2008 edition of Education Week


Commenting has been disabled on edweek.org effective Sept. 8. Please visit our FAQ section for more details. To get in touch with us visit our contact page, follow us on social media, or submit a Letter to the Editor.


Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
What’s Next for Teaching and Learning? Key Trends for the New School Year
The past 18 months changed the face of education forever, leaving teachers, students, and families to adapt to unprecedented challenges in teaching and learning. As we enter the third school year affected by the pandemic—and
Content provided by Instructure
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Webinar
How Data and Digital Curriculum Can Drive Personalized Instruction
As we return from an abnormal year, it’s an educator’s top priority to make sure the lessons learned under adversity positively impact students during the new school year. Digital curriculum has emerged from the pandemic
Content provided by Kiddom
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Equity & Diversity Webinar
Leadership for Racial Equity in Schools and Beyond
While the COVID-19 pandemic continues to reveal systemic racial disparities in educational opportunity, there are revelations to which we can and must respond. Through conscientious efforts, using an intentional focus on race, school leaders can
Content provided by Corwin

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Curriculum What's the Best Way to Address Unfinished Learning? It's Not Remediation, Study Says
A new study suggests acceleration may be a promising strategy for addressing unfinished learning in math after a pandemic year.
5 min read
Female high school student running on the stairs leads to an opportunity to success
CreativaImages/iStock/Getty Images Plus
Curriculum School Halts Use of Fictional Book in Which Officer Kills a Black Child
Fifth graders in at least one Broward County school were assigned to read a book that critics say casts police officers as racist liars.
Rafael Olmeda, South Florida Sun-Sentinel
5 min read
Broward County School Board member Lori Alhadeff listens during a meeting of the Broward County School Board, Tuesday, March 5, 2019, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Broward County School Board member Lori Alhadeff listens during a meeting of the Broward County School Board in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Alhadeff told the South Florida Sun-Sentinel that she does not feel like the book "Ghost Boys" is appropriate for 5th graders.
Lynne Sladky/AP
Curriculum Opinion Introducing Primary Sources to Students
Five educators share strategies for introducing primary sources to students, including English-language learners.
12 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty
Curriculum Opinion Eight Ways to Teach With Primary Sources
Four educators share ways they use primary sources with students, including a strategy called "Zoom."
13 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty