Law & Courts News in Brief

Three Ex-Atlanta Educators Get Sentences Reduced

By The Associated Press — May 05, 2015 1 min read
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A judge last week sharply reduced the sentences for three former Atlanta educators who received the harshest prison terms in the city’s test-cheating trial.

Fulton County Superior Court Judge Jerry Baxter reduced the sentences for Tamara Cotman, Sharon Davis-Williams, and Michael Pitts. Each was given three years in prison and seven on probation. They were also fined and sentenced to community service. Originally, each had been sentenced to seven years in prison and 13 on probation—or more than double what prosecutors had recommended.

Each defendant also was given a $10,000 fine, compared with the original sentence of a $25,000 fine.

A version of this article appeared in the May 06, 2015 edition of Education Week as Three Ex-Atlanta Educators Get Sentences Reduced

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