Federal

Technology Adviser Leaves Department

By Andrew Trotter — August 09, 2005 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Susan D. Patrick, the chief adviser on educational technology to Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings, planned to leave the U.S. Department of Education the end of last week to become the president and chief executive officer of the North American Council for Online Learning.

BRIC ARCHIVE

“I believe it is a great opportunity to be part of the quiet revolution transforming education,” Ms. Patrick said of her decision to join the Alexandria, Va.-based group, which promotes online education. She is scheduled to start her new job in September. Education Department officials said they would begin looking for a new director of the office of educational technology.

Ms. Patrick, 35, was named to the post in March 2004 by then-Secretary Rod Paige. She arrived in Washington as the technology office’s deputy director in October 2002 from a background in higher education and distance learning.

In an interview, she said her greatest accomplishment at the department was crafting the nation’s third educational technology plan. Released in January, it outlines technology’s potential to improve learning in classrooms and online, to help schools make better use of data, and to make schooling more interesting to students and more relevant to the workplaces of the future. (“Ed. Tech. Plan Is Focused on Broad Themes,” Jan. 12, 2005)

“Susan did a great job,” said Melinda G. George, the executive director of the Washington-based State Education Technology Directors Association. “Clearly, the accomplishment of a national educational technology plan is her legacy.”

But the plan—required by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001—was also criticized for not defining roles or funding responsibilities for the federal government to support the use of technology in schools.

During Ms. Patrick’s tenure, Congress slashed by 27 percent the $500 billion Enhancing Education Through Technology program, which helps states and districts pursue many of the technology plan’s goals.

And President Bush’s budget proposal for fiscal 2006 called for dropping all funding for the program; education groups have successfully lobbied the House and Senate appropriations committees to restore at least part of the program’s funding in the education spending bills they approved this summer.

A version of this article appeared in the August 10, 2005 edition of Education Week

Events

Special Education K-12 Essentials Forum Innovative Approaches to Special Education
Join this free virtual event to explore innovations in the evolving landscape of special education.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Webinar
STEM Fusion: Empowering K-12 Education through Interdisciplinary Integration
Join our webinar to learn how integrating STEM with other subjects can revolutionize K-12 education & prepare students for the future.
Content provided by Project Lead The Way
School & District Management Webinar How Pensions Work: Why It Matters for K-12 Education
Panelists explain the fundamentals of teacher pension finances — how they are paid for, what drives their costs, and their impact on K-12 education.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Federal Social Media Should Come With a Warning, Says U.S. Surgeon General
A surgeon general's warning label would alert users that “social media is associated with significant mental health harms in adolescents.”
4 min read
Image of social media icons and warning label.
iStock + Education Week
Federal Classroom Tech Outpaces Research. Why That's a Problem
Experts call for better alignment between research and the classroom in Capitol Hill discussions.
4 min read
People walk outside the U.S Capitol building in Washington, June 9, 2022.
People walk outside the U.S Capitol building in Washington, June 9, 2022. Experts called for investments in education research and development at a symposium at the Dirksen Senate Office Building on June 13.
Patrick Semansky/AP
Federal Opinion Federal Education Reform Has Largely Failed. Unfortunately, We Still Need It
Neither NCLB nor ESSA have lived up to their promise, but the problems calling for national action persist.
Jack Jennings
4 min read
Red, Blue, and Purple colors over a fine line etching of the Capitol building. Republicans and Democrats, Partisan Politicians.
Douglas Rissing/iStock
Federal A More Complete Picture of Immigration's Impact on U.S. Public Schools
House Republicans say a migrant influx has caused "chaos" in K-12 schools. The reality is more complicated.
10 min read
Parents and community members rally outside P.S. 189 to protest New York City Mayor Eric Adam's plan to temporarily house immigrants in the school's gymnasium, seen in the background on May 16, 2023, in New York.
Parents and community members rally outside P.S. 189 to protest New York City Mayor Eric Adam's plan to temporarily house immigrants in the school's gymnasium, seen in the background on May 16, 2023, in New York.
John Minchillo/AP