Accountability

Teacher-Training Schools Meeting NCATE-Set Assessment Standards

By Vaishali Honawar — March 14, 2006 4 min read

At Emporia State University in Kansas, candidates for teacher education are assessed at multiple points, from the time they are admitted to the program until they graduate. The assessments are analyzed to determine whether candidates are acquiring the requisite knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions to enter a classroom.

At Winthrop University in Rock Hill, S.C., each program area issues an annual analysis of teacher-candidate performance, as well as plans to address weaknesses revealed by the data.

Those are but a few of the teacher-training programs highlighted in a report from the Washington-based National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education that investigates how institutions are complying with the performance-based assessment standards it instituted in 2001. The standards were revamped in part to address complaints that such institutions did an inadequate job of preparing their graduates.

Data-Driven Improvement

Under NCATE standards, schools of education are required to provide evidence that their graduates have the knowledge and skills to teach successfully. To do so, the institutions must put systems in place that regularly gauge student performance and use the data to improve their programs. The colleges are required to evaluate candidates from the time they start, at appropriate transition points, and at program completion.

Get more information on how to order “Spotlight on Schools of Education: Institutional Responses to NCATE Standards 1 and 2" from the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

Based on a review of 58 accreditation reports written in fall 2003, the NCATE report scheduled for release this week indicates that some complaints of teacher education programs not having to answer for the quality of their graduates are unjustified.

“I would say to critics that change is occurring, and the evidence will increasingly mount that teacher preparation carried out properly will be even more effective in preparing teachers for the very demanding roles that they will have in today’s world,” said NCATE President Arthur E. Wise.

Schools have risen to the challenge of implementing the standards, he said, adding that most NCATE-accredited schools now have assessment systems in place.

“The consequence of this is to focus the universities’ and faculty members’ attention on what candidates know and do. This is a very big change,” Mr. Wise said. “In the past, everyone’s energies were focused on the content of courses and experiences that they offered.”

A survey of more than 1,000 education school deans and NCATE coordinators last year found that 93 percent of respondents agreed that their own institutions showed better alignment between standards, curriculum, instruction, and assessment as a result of working with the NCATE standards.

More than eight in 10 said the standards had prompted faculty members to focus more on student learning, to improve their assessment techniques, and to better track the knowledge and skills of teacher-candidates.

At Emporia State, an assessment system had been in place for a long time, even before NCATE’s revised standards, but, said Tes Mehring, the dean of the Teachers College, “NCATE assisted us to be more systematic.”

In the past, data were collected by individual departments and the information was not always shared. Now, said Dean Mehring, “regardless of where the program is housed, whether in arts or sciences, the data come back to the teacher college, where it is aggregated and discussed.” The data are used to identify strengths and weaknesses in the program and make modifications.

While the process of setting up the data system was labor-intensive, college offices say they reaped benefits once it was up.

“We are looking at candidates all the time, not just once or twice a year, and the data we gain from that we immediately use to improve a program,” said Patricia Graham, the dean of the college of education at Winthrop University.

University officials say they are constantly finding new uses for the data systems.

Winthrop officials found that large numbers of pre-majors were giving up their teaching aspirations in the freshman and sophomore years because they did not have the required 2.75 grade point average, said Associate Dean Caroline Everington.

The college is now getting in touch with such students, pointing them to resources that will help them achieve the required GPA, and having advisers work with them to keep them on track to enroll in the college of education.

More Change Needed

NCATE accredits about half the nation’s 1,200 schools of education; almost 100 more have applied for accreditation. The organization reviews and revises its standards every seven years, and is examining whether any changes are called for. Mr. Wise said revisions in 2008 would be modest because NCATE is largely satisfied with the direction that institutions are taking under the 2001 standards.

But the report makes some suggestions for improvement. It urges teacher colleges to work harder to devise assessments of academic-content knowledge, which, it acknowledges, is difficult because content-area courses are often housed in liberal arts colleges and not in colleges of education.

The accrediting agency also recommends that institutions continue working toward developing more assessments for advanced-level programs, such as school administration and school counseling.

Overall, the report concludes, institutions are undergoing “meaningful change.”

“Accredited institutions have made a paradigm shift,” it says. “The institutions are more learner-focused, more data-driven, and more accountable for producing educators who will have a positive impact on student learning than ever before.”

A version of this article appeared in the March 15, 2006 edition of Education Week as Teacher-Training Schools Meeting NCATE-Set Assessment Standards

Events

School & District Management Live Event Education Week Leadership Symposium
Education Week's Premier Leadership Event for K12 School & District Leaders.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Law & Courts Webinar
The Future of Criminal Justice Reform: A Sphere Education Initiative Conversation
America’s criminal justice system is in crisis and calls for reform are dominating the national debate. Join Cato’s Sphere Education Initiative and Education Week for a webinar on criminal justice and policing featuring the nation’s
Content provided by Cato Institute
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Equity, Care and Connection: New SEL Tools and Practices to Support Students and Adults
As school districts plan to welcome students back into buildings for the upcoming school year, this is the perfect time to take a hard look at both our practices and our systems to build a
Content provided by Panorama Education

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Accountability Opinion Absenteeism Is the Wrong Student Engagement Metric to Use Right Now
In a post-pandemic era for school accountability, let’s focus on measuring what matters.
Sara Johnson, Annette Anderson & Ruth R. Faden
4 min read
Figure being erased.
Getty
Accountability Biden Education Team Squashes States' Push to Nix All Tests but Approves Other Flexibility
The department has telegraphed its decision to deny states' requests to cancel federally mandated tests for weeks.
3 min read
A first-grader learns keyboarding skills at Bayview Elementary School in San Pablo, Calif on March 12, 2015. Schools around the country are teaching students as young as 6 years old, basic typing and other keyboarding skills. The Common Core education standards adopted by a majority of states call for students to be able to use technology to research, write and give oral presentations, but the imperative for educators arrived with the introduction of standardized tests that are taken on computers instead of with paper and pencils.
The U.S. Department of Education denied some states' requests to cancel standardized tests this year. Others are seeking flexibility from some testing requirements, rather than skipping the assessments altogether.
Eric Risberg/AP
Accountability Explainer Will There Be Standardized Tests This Year? 8 Questions Answered
Educators want to know: Will the exams happen? If so, what will they look like, and how will the results be used?
12 min read
Students testing.
Getty
Accountability Opinion What Should School Accountability Look Like in a Time of COVID-19?
Remote learning is not like in person, and after nine months of it, data are revealing how harmful COVID-19 has been to children's learning.
6 min read
Image shows a speech bubble divided into 4 overlapping, connecting parts.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty and Laura Baker/Education Week