Law & Courts News in Brief

Okla. Court Asked to Toss Repeal of Common Core

By Andrew Ujifusa — July 08, 2014 1 min read

A petition from members of the Oklahoma board of education, as well as parents and teachers, is asking the state’s highest court to throw out a new law that repeals the Common Core State Standards. The petition, filed June 25, claims that the law gives the state legislature too much power over the standards-adoption process.

Robert McCampbell, the lawyer for the petitioners, told the state Supreme Court that while lawmakers have a role to play in education, the new law “goes beyond setting policy and would have the legislature involved in actually administering what would be happening inside Oklahoma classrooms.”

A spokesman for Gov. Mary Fallin told The Oklahoman that the governor hopes the repeal of common core will stand, even if the court takes action on the legislature’s new powers.

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A version of this article appeared in the July 10, 2014 edition of Education Week as Okla. Court Asked to Toss Repeal of Common Core

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