Law & Courts News in Brief

Federal Judge Dismisses Lawsuit Against Anti-Plagiarism Software

By Andrew Trotter — April 08, 2008 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

A federal judge in Alexandria, Va., has dismissed a lawsuit alleging copyright infringement by iParadigms LLC, the company that runs the Turnitin plagiarism-detection service.

Four high school students had sued the company over the use of their written works, which the service had collected in an archive and used to assess the originality of newly submitted student papers. (“Online Anti-Plagiarism Service Sets Off Court Fight,” May 4, 2007).

In his March 11 opinion, U.S. District Judge Claude M. Hilton wrote that the use of the student works constituted “a fair use under U.S. copyright law and is therefore not copyright infringement.”

The judge stated that such use “provides a substantial public benefit through the network of institutions using Turnitin.”

See Also

For more stories on this topic see Law and Courts.

A version of this article appeared in the April 09, 2008 edition of Education Week

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Law & Courts Webinar
Future of the First Amendment: Exploring Trends in High School Students’ Views of Free Speech
Learn how educators are navigating student free speech issues and addressing controversial topics like gender and race in the classroom.
Content provided by The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Start Strong With Solid SEL Implementation: Success Strategies for the New School Year
Join Satchel Pulse to learn why implementing a solid SEL program at the beginning of the year will deliver maximum impact to your students.
Content provided by Satchel Pulse
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Science Webinar
Real-World Problem Solving: How Invention Education Drives Student Learning
Hear from student inventors and K-12 teachers about how invention education enhances learning, opens minds, and preps students for the future.
Content provided by The Lemelson Foundation

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Law & Courts At the Supreme Court, High School Students Express Disappointment Over Abortion Decision
Students showed up to flex their civic muscles in the wake of the court ruling.
4 min read
From left, teenagers Sonia and Lilia Oulamine march outside the Supreme Court on June 24, 2022.
From left, Sonia and Lilia Oulamine march outside the Supreme Court on June 24, 2022.
Eesha Pendharkar/Education Week
Law & Courts What the 'Roe v. Wade' Reversal Means for Educators, Schools, and Students
The decision will dramatically reshape the context of schooling for the women-dominated profession—as well as affect students, counselors, and health curricula.
7 min read
Anti-abortion and abortion-rights protesters gather outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, June 24, 2022. The Supreme Court has ended constitutional protections for abortion that had been in place nearly 50 years, a decision by its conservative majority to overturn the court's landmark abortion cases.
Anti-abortion and abortion-rights protesters gather outside the Supreme Court Friday. The court issued a ruling ending constitutional protections for abortion that had been in place for nearly 50 years.
Jose Luis Magana/AP
Law & Courts Supreme Court Overturns 'Roe v. Wade’; States Can Ban Abortion
The decision, unthinkable just a few years ago, was the culmination of decades of efforts by abortion opponents.
7 min read
A celebration outside the Supreme Court, Friday, June 24, 2022, in Washington. The Supreme Court has ended constitutional protections for abortion that had been in place nearly 50 years — a decision by its conservative majority to overturn the court's landmark abortion cases. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Law & Courts School Groups Worry as Supreme Court Recognizes Right to Carry Handguns in Public
In a 6-3 decision over a New York state law, the court says little about schools as 'sensitive places' where guns can be prohibited.
6 min read
Members of the Supreme Court pose for a group photo at the court in 2021.
Members of the U.S. Supreme Court pose for a group photo at the court in 2021.
Erin Schaff/The New York Times via AP