Find your next job fast at the Jan. 28 Virtual Career Fair. Register now.
Federal

Federal File

May 09, 2001 1 min read

Training Congress

Commuters and tourists shuffling through the Washington-area Metrorail system are getting a dose of education lobbying this spring.

As they make their way toward the escalator at the Union Station subway stop, just a couple of blocks from the Capitol, they are greeted by the usual sampling of placards pitching everything from the District of Columbia lottery to Lufthansa Airlines. But there is also an ad featuring three enthusiastic young students and a bold-face headline: “The Futures Market.”

It takes reading the fine print—about two paragraphs—to get the core message, that Congress should pass an education bill requiring high standards and annual testing, among other provisions. The poster is one of several posted at strategically located Metro stations by the Business Roundtable, a coalition of corporate CEOs.

“Our nation’s classrooms are America’s true futures market— where a commitment today will yield individual and national prosperity tomorrow,” the ad intones.

As Congress and the White House haggle over an education bill, this is one of the less orthodox vehicles lobbyist are using to shape the final deal. The business group also has sponsored ads in Roll Call and Congress Daily, two news publications that cover Capitol Hill.

“It’s another way to get our message out,” said John Schachter, a Business Roundtable spokesman. The ads are aimed at the “policymaking audience,” he said, including lawmakers, their staffs, and Bush administration members. He conceded that probably more staff aides than lawmakers will see the ads.

Members of Congress get free parking near the Capitol, so bumping into one on the train is about as likely as spotting an oil tanker on the Potomac. But the ads could reach at least one influential member of the 535- person target audience: Senate education committee Chairman James M. Jeffords, R-Vt. Sen. Jeffords takes the subway “a couple times a week,” his spokesman, Erik Smulson, said last week.

—Erik W. Robelen

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the May 09, 2001 edition of Education Week

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Branding Matters. Learn From the Pros Why and How
Learn directly from the pros why K-12 branding and marketing matters, and how to do it effectively.
Content provided by EdWeek Top School Jobs
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
How to Make Learning More Interactive From Anywhere
Join experts from Samsung and Boxlight to learn how to make learning more interactive from anywhere.
Content provided by Samsung
Teaching Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table With Education Week: How Educators Can Respond to a Post-Truth Era
How do educators break through the noise of disinformation to teach lessons grounded in objective truth? Join to find out.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Director of Information Technology
Montpelier, Vermont
Washington Central UUSD
Great Oaks AmeriCorps Fellow August 2021 - June 2022
New York City, New York (US)
Great Oaks Charter Schools
Director of Athletics
Farmington, Connecticut
Farmington Public Schools
Head of Lower School
San Diego, California
San Diego Jewish Academy

Read Next

Federal How Biden's Data Mandate Could Help Schools Navigate the COVID-19 Crisis
An executive order directs the Education Department to collect data on issues like whether schools offer in-person learning.
4 min read
President Joe Biden signs executive orders after speaking about the coronavirus, accompanied by Vice President Kamala Harris, left, and Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, right, in the State Dinning Room of the White House, on Jan. 21, 2021, in Washington.
President Joe Biden signs executive orders after speaking about the coronavirus, accompanied by Vice President Kamala Harris, left, and Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, right, at the White House, on Jan. 21.
Alex Brandon/AP
Federal Early Education Department Appointees Have Links to Jill Biden, Teachers' Unions
President Joe Biden's 12 appointments have links to the players who could exert the most influence on the new administration's K-12 policy.
4 min read
President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden hug as they arrive at the North Portico of the White House on Jan. 20, 2021.
President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden hug as they arrive at the North Portico of the White House on inauguration day.
Alex Brandon/AP
Federal Biden Launches New Strategy to Combat COVID-19, Reopen Schools
The president plans a more centralized strategy that includes broader vaccine efforts, more data on the pandemic, and new school guidance.
5 min read
Public School 95 in the Gravesend section of Brooklyn is one of many schools in New York ordered to close due to a flare-up of coronavirus cases in the area on Oct. 5, 2020.
Public School 95 in the Gravesend section of Brooklyn is one of many schools in New York ordered to close due to a flare-up of coronavirus cases in the area on Oct. 5, 2020.
Kathy Willens/AP
Federal Opinion Blessings and Best Wishes, President Biden
Rick Hess takes a moment to offer President-elect Biden his best wishes and to reflect on Inauguration Day.
1 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty