Federal

Federal File

May 09, 2001 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Training Congress

Commuters and tourists shuffling through the Washington-area Metrorail system are getting a dose of education lobbying this spring.

As they make their way toward the escalator at the Union Station subway stop, just a couple of blocks from the Capitol, they are greeted by the usual sampling of placards pitching everything from the District of Columbia lottery to Lufthansa Airlines. But there is also an ad featuring three enthusiastic young students and a bold-face headline: “The Futures Market.”

It takes reading the fine print—about two paragraphs—to get the core message, that Congress should pass an education bill requiring high standards and annual testing, among other provisions. The poster is one of several posted at strategically located Metro stations by the Business Roundtable, a coalition of corporate CEOs.

“Our nation’s classrooms are America’s true futures market— where a commitment today will yield individual and national prosperity tomorrow,” the ad intones.

As Congress and the White House haggle over an education bill, this is one of the less orthodox vehicles lobbyist are using to shape the final deal. The business group also has sponsored ads in Roll Call and Congress Daily, two news publications that cover Capitol Hill.

“It’s another way to get our message out,” said John Schachter, a Business Roundtable spokesman. The ads are aimed at the “policymaking audience,” he said, including lawmakers, their staffs, and Bush administration members. He conceded that probably more staff aides than lawmakers will see the ads.

Members of Congress get free parking near the Capitol, so bumping into one on the train is about as likely as spotting an oil tanker on the Potomac. But the ads could reach at least one influential member of the 535- person target audience: Senate education committee Chairman James M. Jeffords, R-Vt. Sen. Jeffords takes the subway “a couple times a week,” his spokesman, Erik Smulson, said last week.

—Erik W. Robelen

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the May 09, 2001 edition of Education Week

Events

Jobs October 2021 Virtual Career Fair for Teachers and K-12 Staff
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Data Webinar
Using Integrated Analytics To Uncover Student Needs
Overwhelmed by data? Learn how an integrated approach to data analytics can help.

Content provided by Instructure
Classroom Technology Webinar How Pandemic Tech Is (and Is Not) Transforming K-12 Schools
The COVID-19 pandemic—and the resulting rise in virtual learning and big investments in digital learning tools— helped educators propel their technology skills to the next level. Teachers have become more adept at using learning management

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Federal National School Board Group's Apology for 'Domestic Terrorism' Letter May Not Quell Uproar
The National School Boards Association voices "regret" for how it sought federal aid to address threats and harassment of school officials.
4 min read
Seminole County, Fla., deputies remove parent Chris Mink of Apopka from an emergency meeting of the Seminole County School Board in Sanford, Fla., Thursday, Sept. 2, 2021. Mink, the parent of a Bear Lake Elementary School student, opposes a call for mask mandates for Seminole schools and was escorted out for shouting during the standing-room only meeting.
Deputies remove a parent from an emergency meeting of the Seminole County School Board in Sanford, Fla., after the parent, who opposes a call for mask mandates for Seminole schools, shouts during the standing-room only meeting.
Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel via AP
Federal 'A Snitch Line on Parents.' GOP Reps Grill AG Over Response to Threats on School Officials
Attorney General Merrick Garland said his effort is meant to address violent threats against school boards, not to stifle parents' dissent.
5 min read
LEFT: Attorney General Merrick Garland speaks during a House Judiciary Committee oversight hearing of the Department of Justice on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 21, 2021. RIGHT: Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, questions Attorney General Merrick Garland.
Attorney General Merrick Garland, left, speaks during a House Judiciary Committee oversight hearing of the U.S. Department of Justice on Capitol Hill on Thursday, questioned by Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, right, among others.
Greg Nash via AP, Andrew Harnik/AP
Federal School Boards, 'Domestic Terrorism,' and Free Speech: Inside the Debate
From critical race theory to COVID policy, the heat on schools has raised issues involving free speech and the safety of public officials.
13 min read
Brenda Stephens, a school board member with Orange County Public Schools in Hillsborough, N.C. has purchased a weapon and taken a concealed carry class over concerns for her personal safety.
Brenda Stephens, a school board member in Hillsborough, N.C., says board members face threats and bullying, an atmosphere far different from what she's encountered in years of board service.
Kate Medley for Education Week
Federal Senate Confirms Catherine Lhamon to Civil Rights Post; Kamala Harris Casts Decisive Vote
Joe Biden's controversial pick to lead the Education Department's office for civil rights held that job in the Obama administration.
2 min read
Catherine Lhamon, nominee to be assistant secretary for civil rights at the Department of Education, testifies during a Senate Health, Education Labor and Pensions Committee confirmation hearing in Dirksen Building on Tuesday, July 13, 2021.
Catherine Lhamon, then-nominee to be assistant secretary for civil rights at the U.S. Department of Education, testifies during a Senate Health, Education Labor and Pensions Committee confirmation hearing in July.
Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via AP Images