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Federal

Duncan Makes it Official

By Alyson Klein — May 26, 2009 2 min read
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Secretary of Education Arne Duncan put out the official list of many of the folks who’ve gotten top positions at the U.S. Department of Education. Most of these aren’t new, but the list is a good Who’s Who of new political appointees.

Another Gates Foundation refugee got a top job. Margot Rogers, formerly the senior counselor to Duncan, will be Arne Duncan’s chief of staff. While at Gates, she managed the foundation’s five-year education strategy.

Juan Sepulveda will be the director of the White House Initiative on the Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans. He was the Texas state director for Obama for America and the former president of The Common Enterprise, whose mission is to help nonprofit groups, philanthropic organizations, and businesses help build stronger communities.

Also among those we’ve already told you about: the Aspen Institute’s Judy Wurtzel as a deputy assistant secretary in the office of planning, evaluation and policy; ex-EdWeek staff David Hoff, deputy assistant secretary for communication development; and, former Prince George’s County Schools spokesman John White as press secretary. And Dianne Piche is the deputy assistant Secretary of Enforcement, Office for Civil Rights. Piche most recently served as executive director of the Citizens’ Commission on Civil Rights.

Kevin Jennings, the assistant deputy secretary for the Office of Safe and Drug Free Schools, is the founder and former executive director of the Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), which works to keep kids safe in school, regardless of their sexual orientation. Before that, Jennings was a history teacher and history department head at Concord Academy in Massachusetts, and a teacher at Moses Brown School in Providence.

Stacey Jordan, director of Intergovernmental Affairs, comes to the department from The Education Sector, where she served as a communications manager. And Jordan also served as special adviser for education policy to the mayor of Providence, R.I., and as director of The New York City Department of Education Office of Strategic Partnerships.

Julius Lloyd Horwich has been tapped as deputy assistant secretary, Office of Legislation and Congressional Affairs. Like lots of folks in leg jobs, Horwich is a Hill veteran. He’s worked with most of the top lawmakers on education policy, so he’ll be well positioned to sell Duncan’s agenda to his old bosses. Horwich recently served as education counsel and policy adviser to the House of Education and Labor Committee, Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary and Secondary Education. And he also worked as an education counsel on the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, Subcommittee on Children and Families and as a policy counsel to Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, a pretty important guy to know since he controls the purse strings on ed spending in the Senate.

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