Federal

Chiefs Crank Heat on ESEA Renewal

By Alyson Klein — February 08, 2011 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

If Congress fails to move soon on renewal of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, states are poised to get going on their own ideas on accountability and other areas, according to a letter sent last week to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, education lawmakers, and party leaders on Capitol Hill.

Key lawmakers in Congress say they are gearing up to reauthorize the law, the current version of which is the No Child Left Behind Act. But if that doesn’t happen quickly, state schools chiefs plan to “propose new, innovative policy models in terms of accountability and other areas that move beyond” the NCLB law, the letter from the Council of Chief State School Officers says.

“We urge the administration and Congress to encourage and support this strategy—so that the current law doesn’t become a further barrier to innovation and achievement,” the letter adds.

The letter also makes clear that the CCSSO wants to see the federal government run with those state-led proposals, instead of making the sort of “discrete fixes” that other organizations—such as the American Association of School Administrators—have called for in asking for regulatory relief from the NCLB statute.

The chiefs say their new and improved plans would keep in place core parts of the law, including basing accountability on student outcomes.

Such elements include the current state-assessment schedule and progress on graduation rates, and disaggregation of data by subgroups, such as racial minorities and students in special education.

They also will seek to have their accountability plans work toward college and career readiness, and focus interventions on the lowest-performing schools, in addition to identifying top performers.

Beyond that, states may also propose other ideas, such as plans for a transition between the NCLB law and the new accountability systems. For instance, they might ask the Department of Education to let schools stay in their current accountability status while their states move to the new assessments and new models.

A version of this article appeared in the February 09, 2011 edition of Education Week as Chiefs Crank Heat on ESEA Renewal

Events

Recruitment & Retention Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table: Chronic Teacher Shortage: Where Do We Go From Here?  
Join Peter DeWitt, Michael Fullan, and guests for expert insights into finding solutions for the teacher shortage.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Achievement Webinar
Mission Possible: Saving Time While Improving Student Outcomes
Learn how district leaders are maximizing instructional time and finding the best resources for student success through their MTSS framework.
Content provided by Panorama Education
Reading & Literacy K-12 Essentials Forum Writing and the Science of Reading
Join us for this free event as we highlight and discuss the intersection of reading and writing with Education Week reporters and expert guests.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Federal USDA Clamps Down on Salt and Sugar in Proposed School Nutrition Guidelines
It marks the first time the federal agency is calling for limiting the amount of added sugars in school meals.
4 min read
Young boy in a school lunchroom cafeteria line and choosing a slice of pizza to put on his tray which includes an apple.
SDI Productions/Getty
Federal Q&A Boosting 'Pathetically Low' Teacher Pay Is Top of Mind for Bernie Sanders
The progressive senator from Vermont spoke with Education Week as he prepares to chair the Senate's education committee.
6 min read
Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., talks with reporters outside the West Wing of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2023.
Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., talks with reporters outside the West Wing of the White House in Washington, in late January.
Susan Walsh/AP
Federal What’s Behind the Push for a $60K Base Teacher Salary
When reintroduced in Congress, a bill to raise teacher salaries will include money to account for regional cost differences.
5 min read
Teachers from Seattle Public Schools picket outside Roosevelt High School on what was supposed to be the first day of classes, Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2022, in Seattle. The first day of classes at Seattle Public Schools was cancelled and teachers are on strike over issues that include pay, mental health support, and staffing ratios for special education and multilingual students.
Teachers from Seattle Public Schools picket outside Roosevelt High School on what was supposed to be the first day of classes, Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2022, in Seattle. The first day of classes at Seattle Public Schools was cancelled and teachers are on strike over issues that include pay, mental health support, and staffing ratios for special education and multilingual students.
Jason Redmond/AP
Federal Teachers Shouldn't Have to Drive Ubers on the Side, Education Secretary Says
In a speech on priorities for the year, U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona said teachers should be paid competitive salaries.
5 min read
U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona delivers a speech during the “Raise the Bar: Lead the World” event in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 24, 2023.
U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona delivers a speech during the “Raise the Bar: Lead the World” event in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 24, 2023.
Sam Mallon/Education Week