Equity & Diversity Report Roundup

School Discipline

“The Striking Outlier: The Persistent, Painful and Problematic Practice of Corporal Punishment in Schools”
By Sarah D. Sparks — June 18, 2019 1 min read
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In schools that use corporal punishment, students with disabilities and black students are disproportionately more likely to be hit than their peers, finds a new report by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Only 4 percent of U.S. public schools used the practice in 2013-14. Students with disabilities had higher rates of corporal punishment across states. Black boys were twice as likely to be hit as white boys, and black girls three times as likely to be hit as white girls, it found.

A version of this article appeared in the June 19, 2019 edition of Education Week as School Discipline

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