School & District Management

Ruling on Workplace Speech Affects Superintendent’s Case

By Andrew Trotter — March 20, 2007 3 min read

A recent federal appeals court decision shows the impact of a U.S. Supreme Court decision from last year on First Amendment protections for government employees who face adverse job actions based on their speech in the workplace.

Under high court precedents, a public employee is protected when he or she speaks as a citizen on a matter of public concern, if the employee’s interest in commenting outweighs the interest of the government agency as the employer.

But in the May 2006 decision in Garcetti v. Ceballos, the justices ruled 5-4 that when public employees speak “pursuant to their official duties, the employees are not speaking as citizens for First Amendment purposes, and the Constitution does not insulate their communications from employer discipline.”

That ruling has affected a lawsuit brought by Barbara P. Casey, who served as the superintendent of the 2,200-student West Las Vegas, N.M., school district from January 2002 to April 2003.

Ms. Casey sued the West Las Vegas school district for damages after the school board demoted her and voted not to renew her contract when she reported alleged irregularities in the district’s Head Start program, other administrative operations, and the board’s compliance with New Mexico’s open-meetings law.

Ms. Casey told the board president that as many as half the district’s families with children enrolled in Head Start—the federal preschool program for disadvantaged children—came from families that appeared to have incomes too high to qualify for participation.

When the board president rebuffed her, Ms. Casey sent her concerns to federal Head Start officials, who ordered the district to reimburse more than $500,000 in federal aid.

After she advised the board that it was violating the open-meetings law, and seeing no change, she filed a complaint with New Mexico’s attorney general, who wrote to the board president about the allegations. The attorney general later determined that the board had violated the law and ordered corrective action.

Ms. Casey sued, alleging retaliation for exercising her First Amendment rights.

A federal district judge in Albuquerque refused to dismiss the case, and the district appealed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, in Denver.

Before the appeals court heard arguments in the case, the Supreme Court issued its Garcetti decision. Applying the high court precedent in a Jan. 24 decision, a three-judge 10th Circuit court panel held unanimously that Ms. Casey was “acting pursuant to her official duties” in reporting problems with the Head Start program.

“[I]t is undisputed that Ms. Casey was designated by the board as the CEO and person primarily responsible for the sound administration of the district’s Head Start program,” including overseeing compliance with federal regulations, Judge Neil M. Gorsuch wrote.

The panel also concluded that Ms. Casey’s speech about problems in other administrative operations was also part of her job—and ineligible for free-speech protection.

But the panel came to a different conclusion about Ms. Casey’s allegations with respect to the board’s violations of the state open-meetings law.

“Neither the board nor any other legal authority ever assigned Ms. Casey responsibility for the board’s meeting practices,” Judge Gorsuch wrote. “Accordingly, we conclude that Ms. Casey’s conduct fell sufficiently outside the scope of her office to survive even the force of the Supreme Court’s decision in Garcetti.

The court ruled that Ms. Casey could pursue her claim of retaliation in the district court, based on her reporting of the open-meetings-law violations.

See Also

For more stories on this topic see Law and Courts.

A version of this article appeared in the March 21, 2007 edition of Education Week

Events

Student Well-Being Webinar Boosting Teacher and Student Motivation During the Pandemic: What It Takes
Join Alyson Klein and her expert guests for practical tips and discussion on how to keep students and teachers motivated as the pandemic drags on.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
A Holistic Approach to Social-Emotional Learning
Register to learn about the components and benefits of holistically implemented SEL.
Content provided by Committee for Children
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
How Principals Can Support Student Well-Being During COVID
Join this webinar for tips on how to support and prioritize student health and well-being during COVID.
Content provided by Unruly Studios

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Interdisciplinary STEAM Specialist
Smyrna, Georgia
St. Benedict's Episcopal School
Interdisciplinary STEAM Specialist
Smyrna, Georgia
St. Benedict's Episcopal School
Arizona School Data Analyst - (AZVA)
Arizona, United States
K12 Inc.
Software Engineer
Portland, OR, US
Northwest Evaluation Association

Read Next

School & District Management Opinion New Resource Tracks School System Reopening
The Return to Learn Tracker identifies the current instructional model of all regular public school districts with three or more schools.
5 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
School & District Management San Francisco School Board Pauses Renaming 44 Schools, Promises to Consult Historians
The renaming of 44 schools in the San Francisco Unified School District is apparently being put on hold after intense blowback.
Greg Keraghosian
1 min read
A pedestrian walks below a sign for Dianne Feinstein Elementary School in San Francisco, on Dec. 17, 2020. The San Francisco Unified School District put the renaming of 44 schools, including Dianne Feinstein Elementary School, on hold after local and national blowback.
A pedestrian walks below a sign for Dianne Feinstein Elementary School in San Francisco, on Dec. 17, 2020. The San Francisco Unified School District put the renaming of 44 schools, including Dianne Feinstein Elementary School, on hold after local and national blowback.<br/><br/>
Jeff Chiu/AP
School & District Management Superintendent Who Led During COVID-19 School Shutdowns Gets Top Honors
Michelle Reid of Washington state's Northshore district, one of the very first to close schools last March, was named National Superintendent of the Year.
3 min read
Michelle Reid, superintendent of the Northshore district in Washington
Michelle Reid, the superintendent of the Northshore district in Washington, was named National Superintendent of the Year.
courtesy of AASA, the School Superintendents Association
School & District Management Is Lunchtime the 'Weak Link' in School Reopening Plans?
It's risky when students are inside and unmasked, experts say. Here are five ways to mitigate that risk and make in-school meals safer.
11 min read
Elementary students in Brownsville, Texas, eat a socially distanced lunch in the school cafeteria. Experts say there are ways to mitigate the risk of contracting COVID-19 even when kids take their masks off to eat.
Elementary students in Brownsville, Texas, eat a socially distanced lunch in the school cafeteria. Experts say there are ways to mitigate the risk of contracting COVID-19 when kids take their masks off to eat.
Denise Cathey/The Brownsville Herald via AP