Court Cases

Education news, analysis, and opinion about lawsuits and legal proceedings
Amanda Jones, a librarian in Livingston Parish, La., pictured on Sept. 13, 2022. Jones is suing members of a Facebook group who harassed her virtually after she spoke against censorship in a public library meeting. Jones received angry emails and even a death threat from people across the country after she filed the lawsuit.
Amanda Jones, a librarian in Livingston Parish, La., is suing members of a Facebook group who harassed her virtually after she spoke against censorship in a public library meeting.
Claire Bangser for Education Week
Law & Courts A School Librarian Pushes Back on Censorship and Gets Death Threats and Online Harassment
Amanda Jones lost her legal battle against online harassers this week but vows to continue to press her case.
Eesha Pendharkar, September 22, 2022
7 min read
The U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, Monday, June 27, 2022.
The U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, Monday, June 27, 2022.
Patrick Semansky/AP
Law & Courts Affirmative Action Cases Lead What Could Prove Another Momentous Supreme Court Term
The cases on race in college admissions could affect K-12. The justices will also weigh copyright, American Indian law, and LGBTQ rights.
Mark Walsh, September 22, 2022
7 min read
A Juul electronic cigarette starter kit at a smoke shop in New York on Dec. 20, 2018. In a deal announced Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022, electronic cigarette maker Juul Labs will pay nearly $440 million to settle a two-year investigation by 33 states into the marketing of its high-nicotine vaping products, which have long been blamed for sparking a national surge in teen vaping.
The electronic cigarette company Juul will pay nearly $440 million to settle an investigation by 33 states into the marketing of its products, blamed for a national surge in teen vaping.
Seth Wenig/AP
Law & Courts School Districts' Legal Battle With Juul Isn't Over
States recent settlement with the vape company doesn't end districts separate lawsuits.
Mark Walsh, September 8, 2022
5 min read
Conceptual image of genders.
Anne-Marie Miller/iStock/Getty
Law & Courts Guidelines Supporting Trans Students Don't Violate Parents' Rights, A Federal Judge Rules
A Maryland U.S. district court judge ruled that a policy to protect trans and non-binary students doesn't violate parents' federal rights.
Eesha Pendharkar, August 31, 2022
5 min read
Scales of justice and Gavel on wooden table and Lawyer or Judge working with agreement in Courtroom, Justice and Law concept.
Pattanaphong Khuankaew/iStock
Law & Courts Court Backs Fellowship of Christian Athletes in Clash Over School LGBTQ Bias Policy
A federal appeals court said the San Jose, Calif., school district applied its anti-discrimination policy inconsistently.
Mark Walsh, August 29, 2022
4 min read
A school resource officer in Anderson, Calif., walks a middle school student back to class on Dec. 9, 2013.
A school resource officer and middle school student in Anderson, Calif., walk to class on Dec. 9, 2013. In a case involving an SRO in Florida, a federal appeals court has voted to revive a civil claim for excessive force on behalf of a student.
Andreas Fuhrmann/The Record Searchlight via AP
Law & Courts New Court Ruling Allows Former School Resource Officer to Be Sued for Excessive Force
In a relatively rare denial of qualified immunity for a police officer, a federal appeals court revives a student's civil claim.
Mark Walsh, August 25, 2022
3 min read
Palm trees are visible around the water tower in Uvalde, Texas, on July 20, 2022.
Palm trees surround the water tower in Uvalde, Texas. The town is the site of one of the worst school shootings in U.S. history.
Jordan Vonderhaar for Education Week
Equity & Diversity In Uvalde, Pain Where There Once Was Pride
Past and present residents of Uvalde, Texas, recount a deeper story of Robb Elementary—one that began years before the May 24 mass shooting.
Ileana Najarro, August 16, 2022
12 min read
Students walking in the streets of Uvalde, Texas participating in the 1970 Uvalde School Walkout. Pictured bottom right in numerical order are Mary Helen Canales, Lee Lugo, and Alfred Santos.
Students walk in the streets of Uvalde, Texas during the 1970 Uvalde School Walkout.
Courtesy of Voces Oral History Center at The University of Texas at Austin
Equity & Diversity Uvalde Schools Aren't Defined by One Tragedy. Here Are Key Moments in Their History
The schools of Uvalde, Texas, have a rich history that goes beyond the tragedy that occurred at Robb Elementary in May.
Ileana Najarro, August 16, 2022
2 min read
Image of a pending lawsuit.
gesrey/iStock/Getty
Law & Courts Conservative Parent Group Sues School District Over Curriculum That Discusses Race and Gender
The lawsuit, among the first to cite a state law curbing discussions of those topics, could have broad implications for school districts.
Sarah Schwartz, July 26, 2022
9 min read
Image of a gavel
iStock/Getty
Law & Courts Appeals Court Revives Student's Free Speech Suit Over Antisemitic Social Media Post
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit reinstated a case involving an off-campus post referring to the extermination of Jews.
Mark Walsh, July 8, 2022
3 min read
Paul D. Clement at the lectern for the petitioner.
A sketch by Art Lien, who just retired after a long career as a courtroom artist, shows U.S. Supreme Court arguments in April in <i>Kennedy</i> v. <i>Bremerton School District</i>, a case about a high school football coach's post-game prayers and one of several cases of interest to educators during the court's 2021-22 term.
Art Lien
Law & Courts The Supreme Court and Education: Key Rulings That Impact Schools
A recap of the court's decisions that are relevant to schools and educators.
Mark Walsh, June 30, 2022
4 min read
Globe with two ethnic characters holding symbolism for various world religions.
iStock/Getty Images Plus
Law & Courts Why Some Religious Groups Worry After Supreme Court Sided With Praying High School Coach
Concerns arise about equal treatment of students and employees from minority religious groups after a ruling on a Christian coach's prayers.
Evie Blad, June 28, 2022
5 min read
Joe Kennedy, a former assistant football coach at Bremerton High School in Bremerton, Wash., poses for a photo March 9, 2022, at the school's football field. After losing his coaching job for refusing to stop kneeling in prayer with players and spectators on the field immediately after football games, Kennedy will take his arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday, April 25, 2022, saying the Bremerton School District violated his First Amendment rights by refusing to let him continue praying at midfield after games.
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled in favor of former Bremerton (Wash.) High School assistant football coach Joseph A. Kennedy that his post-game prayers were protected by the First Amendment.
Ted S. Warren/AP
Law & Courts Supreme Court Says High School Coach's Post-Game Prayers Protected by the First Amendment
The decision could have enormous practical consequences for school districts and their supervision of teachers and other employees.
Mark Walsh, June 27, 2022
9 min read
Anti-abortion and abortion-rights protesters gather outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Friday, June 24, 2022. The Supreme Court has ended constitutional protections for abortion that had been in place nearly 50 years, a decision by its conservative majority to overturn the court's landmark abortion cases.
Anti-abortion and abortion-rights protesters gather outside the Supreme Court Friday. The court issued a ruling ending constitutional protections for abortion that had been in place for nearly 50 years.
Jose Luis Magana/AP
Law & Courts What the 'Roe v. Wade' Reversal Means for Educators, Schools, and Students
The decision will dramatically reshape the context of schooling for the women-dominated profession—as well as affect students, counselors, and health curricula.
Sarah Schwartz, June 24, 2022
7 min read