Equity & Diversity

Hispanic Education Law Enacted in New Mexico

By Mary Ann Zehr — April 05, 2010 1 min read

| NEW MEXICO | Gov. Bill Richardson, a Democrat, has signed into law the Hispanic Education Act, which aims to close the achievement gap for Hispanic and other students. The measure, which he had proposed, creates a Hispanic advisory council and a liaison to bring recommendations on Hispanic education to the state’s secretary of education.

Gov. Bill Richardson answers reporters' questions during a news conference in Santa Fe, N.M. Lawmakers passed a bill aimed at the Hispanic achievement gap that the governor proposed.

But the legislature did not appropriate funds for that piece of new legislation as well as others pertaining to K-12 education that the body had approved and the governor signed.

Gov. Bill Richardson
Democrat
Senate:
27 Democrats
15 Republicans
House:
45 Democrats
25 Republicans
Enrollment:
328,000

Out of a $5.6 billion state budget for fiscal 2011 signed by the governor on March 24, $2.4 billion is appropriated to support K-12 public schools, up from $2.3 billion in the current fiscal year. But that increase was not enough to make up for the temporary aid through federal economic-stimulus funding the state received for the current year, so the net effect is a 1.2 percent decrease in total public school support, said state education officials.

The legislature also passed a measure that expands the states dual-credit program to include high school students in Bureau of Indian Education schools and tribal colleges in New Mexico, along with a law aimed at increasing school boards financial accountability.

A version of this article appeared in the April 07, 2010 edition of Education Week as Hispanic Education Law Enacted in New Mexico

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