School & District Management A National Roundup

D.C. Mayor Signs Bill on Control of City’s Public School System

By Lesli A. Maxwell — May 01, 2007 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Mayor Adrian M. Fenty last week signed legislation that would empower him to run the District of Columbia’s 55,000-student public school system.

Congress must still approve a change to the city’s Home Rule Charter before Mr. Fenty can assume full control, but the mayor pledged to move ahead immediately. The District of Columbia’s Council gave the plan final approval last week.

The measure would give Mr. Fenty, a Democrat who was elected last November, authority to hire and fire the superintendent, as well as control of the school system’s operating budget and its $2.3 billion capital building program.

He would join the mayors of Boston, Chicago, and New York City, who also have authority over their city’s public school systems.

Washington’s elected school board would be stripped of its authority over the budgeting process, collective bargaining, instruction, and other day-to-day operations. The panel would remain an elected one, but would instead function like a state board of education responsible for setting academic standards and requirements for instructional time and teacher certification.

Mr. Fenty has not said whether he would keep Superintendent Clifford B. Janey in that post. Robert C. Bobb, the president of the elected school board, who had been opposed to the takeover, and Mr. Janey pledged to work with the mayor last week.

The city’s public schools have struggled for decades with low achievement, spiraling dropout rates, and operational failures.

See Also

See other stories on education issues in the District of Columbia. See data on the District of Columbia’s public school system.

For more stories on this topic see Leadership and Management.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the May 02, 2007 edition of Education Week

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Mathematics Webinar
Addressing Unfinished Learning in Math: Providing Tutoring at Scale
Most states as well as the federal government have landed on tutoring as a key strategy to address unfinished learning from the pandemic. Take math, for example. Studies have found that students lost more ground
Content provided by Yup Math Tutoring
Classroom Technology Webinar Building Better Blended Learning in K-12 Schools
The pandemic and the increasing use of technology in K-12 education it prompted has added renewed energy to the blended learning movement as most students are now learning in school buildings (and will likely continue

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

School & District Management Opinion ‘This Is Not What We Signed Up For’: A Principal’s Plea for More Support
School leaders are playing the role of health-care experts, social workers, mask enforcers, and more. It’s taking a serious toll.
Kristen St. Germain
3 min read
Illustration of a professional woman walking a tightrope.
Laura Baker/Education Week and uzenzen/iStock/Getty
School & District Management Letter to the Editor Educators Must Look to History When They Advocate for Changes
Educators and policymakers must be aware of the history of ideas when making changes in education, says this letter to the editor.
1 min read
Illustration of an open laptop receiving an email.
iStock/Getty
School & District Management Letter to the Editor Reconsidering Causes of Principal Burnout
The state and federal governments are asking us to implement policies that often go against our beliefs, says this letter to the editor.
1 min read
Illustration of an open laptop receiving an email.
iStock/Getty
School & District Management Teachers Want Their Administrators to Teach. Here's Why
Principals and other education administrators should even be required to spend time teaching in the classroom, according to teachers responding to an EdWeek query.
Hayley Hardison
4 min read
Teacher Principal 11122021 1310106400
E+/Getty