July 13, 2011

Education Week, Vol. 30, Issue 36
Early Childhood Report Roundup Early Learning Linked to Adult Successes
Chicago children who attended a high-quality prekindergarten-to-3rd grade learning program tended to be more successful as adults than peers educated in standard preschool and elementary programs, according to a study that tracked 1,400 children for 25 years.
Alexandra Rice, August 15, 2011
1 min read
School & District Management Study Finds Few Learning Gains from Gifted Services
Researchers find that students nearest the eligibility cut-offs for gifted services don't get much of a learning boost from gifted classes.
Sarah D. Sparks, July 13, 2011
4 min read
Researchers found that elementary school students working through narrative math problems were less distracted by irrelevant information if they used a computer program to act out the text by moving images on-screen.
Researchers found that elementary school students working through narrative math problems were less distracted by irrelevant information if they used a computer program to act out the text by moving images on-screen.
Arthur Glenberg/Arizona State University
School & District Management Studies Find Students Learn More by 'Acting Out' Text
New research suggests that more active approaches to reading can promote students' understanding—especially with word problems.
Sarah D. Sparks, July 12, 2011
4 min read
Teaching Profession News in Brief Wis. Union Law Takes Effect
The Wisconsin law limiting collective bargaining for teachers and other public workers took effect June 29.
Sean Cavanagh, July 12, 2011
1 min read
Teaching Profession NEA Relaxes Evaluation Policy, Endorses Obama
Union leaders sought an early endorsement and revisions to how teachers are evaluated, but there was disagreement among delegates.
Stephen Sawchuk, July 12, 2011
6 min read
Education Best of the Blogs Blogs of the Week
July 12, 2011
2 min read
Early Childhood States Face Challenges in Early-Ed. Race to Top Scramble
Experts say projects likely to have the greatest impact are state data systems, rating programs for child-care providers, and assessment tools.
Maureen Kelleher, July 12, 2011
6 min read
College & Workforce Readiness Report Roundup Tuition Guarantee
A new study on the Kalamazoo Promise, a program that offers free state-college tuition to graduates of the Michigan city's high schools, finds that the financial incentive encourages students to work harder and aim for college.
Catherine Gewertz, July 12, 2011
1 min read
Teaching Profession States Curbing 'Double Dipping' by Teachers
Nearly half the states have passed laws in the past couple years that put restrictions on retired teachers returning to the classroom.
Stephen Sawchuk, July 12, 2011
8 min read
Families & the Community Opinion The Futures of School Reform: Readers Respond to the Series
Organized by the Harvard Graduate School of Education, the Futures of School Reform Commentary series and time-limited blog drew a wide range of responses from readers eager to discuss the working groups' visions.
July 12, 2011
6 min read
School & District Management News in Brief Turnaround Schools to Get New Federal Focus
It also announced that it was eliminating the office of safe and drug-free schools.
Michele McNeil, July 12, 2011
1 min read
Education Funding News in Brief Illinois Drops Writing Tests
Illinois drops writing portions of standardized tests for high school juniors.
The Associated Press, July 12, 2011
1 min read
Law & Courts News in Brief Court Supports Students in Principal Parodies
In two major decisions, a federal appeals court ruled that students were within their First Amendment rights to ridicule their principals online.
Mark Walsh, July 12, 2011
1 min read
Equity & Diversity News in Brief Mich. Race-in-Admissions Ban Struck Down
A federal appeals court has invalidated a voter-approved amendment to Michigan's constitution that barred racial preferences in admissions at state universities.
Mark Walsh, July 12, 2011
1 min read
Accountability News in Brief Worst Mich. Schools to Get New Management
Michigan plans to create a new management authority that will take over the lowest-performing schools in the state, starting with Detroit in 2012-13.
Christina A. Samuels, July 12, 2011
1 min read
Standards News in Brief Texas Pulls Out of Chiefs Group
Texas has withdrawn from the Council of Chief State School Officers.
Sean Cavanagh, July 12, 2011
1 min read
Education News in Brief D.C. Cheating Probe Expands
The U.S. Department of Education has joined an investigation into allegations of cheating related to big gains in the District of Columbia schools' standardized test scores.
The Associated Press, July 12, 2011
1 min read
Teaching Profession News in Brief Largest Merit Pay Program Slashed in Budget
The nation's largest teacher merit-pay program fell victim to budget cuts this year, as Texas lawmakers slashed 90 percent of its funding.
McClatchy-Tribune, July 12, 2011
1 min read
Science News in Brief NRC: Put Science on Par With Math
The National Research Council recommends that science should be tested as frequently as mathematics and reading.
Nora Fleming, July 12, 2011
1 min read
Donna Watts, a Maryland education department official, joins her husband, Darrel Watts, for a lunch break outside Mountain Ridge High School, in Frostburg, Md., site of a regional training academy last month on how to implement common academic standards.
Donna Watts, a Maryland education department official, joins her husband, Darrel Watts, for a lunch break outside Mountain Ridge High School, in Frostburg, Md., site of a regional training academy last month on how to implement common academic standards.
Matt Roth for Education Week
Education Funding Md. Teachers Get Training on Common Standards
The state is using Race to the Top resources for extensive professional development in its push for common academic standards.
Sean Cavanagh, July 12, 2011
7 min read
Education Photo Gallery: Big Easy Summer
New Orleans is one of a handful of cities that have enhanced their summer programs with creative funding and partnerships. In this slide show, Education Week shows the impact of a New Orleans Recreation Development Commission camp and other summer programs that are helping low income students in the hurricane-ravaged Treme neighborhood, where youngsters have historically had few opportunities to prevent summer learning loss.
July 12, 2011
Justin Quigley, 16, a junior at Pittsfield High School, in Pittsfield, N.H., observes a surgery at the Companion Animal Hospital, in Chichester, with Dr. Fiona Doody. He is shadowing veterinarians at the hospital as part of a regional program that seeks to extend students’ learning experiences beyond the traditional classroom.
Justin Quigley, 16, a junior at Pittsfield High School, in Pittsfield, N.H., observes a surgery at the Companion Animal Hospital, in Chichester, with Dr. Fiona Doody. He is shadowing veterinarians at the hospital as part of a regional program that seeks to extend students’ learning experiences beyond the traditional classroom.
Katie Barnes for Education Week
Meeting District Needs New England Project Aims to Use 'i3' Aid for Innovative Learning Approaches
Student-created, teacher-guided learning experiences can take place beyond the traditional classroom setting.
July 12, 2011
8 min read
Protesters gather to support the Tucson Unified School District after Superintendent of Public Instruction John Huppenthal announced earlier this week that the district violated state law by teaching its Mexican-American studies program. A state audit contradicts Huppenthal’s finding, saying “no observable evidence was present to suggest that any classroom within the Tucson Unified School District is in direct violation of the law."
Protesters gather to support the Tucson Unified School District after Superintendent of Public Instruction John Huppenthal announced earlier this week that the district violated state law by teaching its Mexican-American studies program. A state audit contradicts Huppenthal’s finding, saying “no observable evidence was present to suggest that any classroom within the Tucson Unified School District is in direct violation of the law."
Ross D. Franklin/AP
Teaching Ethnic-Studies Classes Tense Subject in Tucson
A Mexican-American studies program doesn't violate a new state law restricting such classes, an audit says, despite the state schools chief's claim.
Mary Ann Zehr, July 12, 2011
4 min read
Tony Brown, 8, plays in New Orleans after taking part in a football camp sponsored by the New Orleans Recreation Development Commission. Some cities and districts have found creative ways to provide summer programs in tough fiscal times.
Tony Brown, 8, plays in New Orleans after taking part in a football camp sponsored by the New Orleans Recreation Development Commission. Some cities and districts have found creative ways to provide summer programs in tough fiscal times.
Matthew Hinton for Education Week
Student Well-Being Creativity Drives Programs to Prevent 'Summer Slide'
By blending funding sources and building partnerships, communities have expanded and re-created summer programs.
Nora Fleming, July 12, 2011
7 min read
A detail of the West Facade of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington.
A detail of the West Facade of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite/AP-File
Law & Courts Education Issues Take Spotlight in High Court
Hot topics included religious-school tax credits, and children's and workers' rights.
Mark Walsh, July 12, 2011
7 min read
Standards State Consortium Scales Back Common-Assessment Design
Citing cost, among other factors, PARCC drops two of the four tests that would have been given to students throughout a school year.
Catherine Gewertz, July 12, 2011
5 min read
Assessment 20-Year Hispanic Academic Gaps Persist in Math, Reading
Despite nearly two decades of academic progress, Hispanic students still trail on national assessments.
Sarah D. Sparks, July 12, 2011
6 min read
In Texas, Flour Bluff High School students demonstrate earlier this spring in support of a schoolmate who was denied permission to form a gay-straight alliance at the school. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan sent a letter to school districts across the country last month, warning them against banning such organizations.
In Texas, Flour Bluff High School students demonstrate earlier this spring in support of a schoolmate who was denied permission to form a gay-straight alliance at the school. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan sent a letter to school districts across the country last month, warning them against banning such organizations.
Todd Yates/Corpus Christi Caller-Times/AP-File
Equity & Diversity Districts Get Warning Against Prohibiting Gay-Straight Alliances
The U.S. Department of Education is advising schools against taking steps to prevent students from forming gay-straight alliances.
Nirvi Shah, July 12, 2011
3 min read