Education

THERE’S NO SCHOOL LIKE OLD SCHOOL

September 30, 2005 1 min read
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Newoldschoolteacher has opted to get a graduate degree in education. “Unfortunately,” she writes, “I am also smart and care about education. You see where I’m going with this.” If you don’t, consider her reaction to two classmates’ defense of constructivist techniques. Suffice it to say, she’s not a huge fan:

The question I pose to them is this: what the hell are you talking about? I went to a public school. My teachers lectured. We didn't do group projects. We didn't really do any projects, except a big research project in 10th grade. And yes, mine did involve making paleolithic tools out of obsidian volcanic rock. That's hard, by the way. But mostly we listened, and we read, and we wrote. We sometimes talked about these things, but not all the time. We had quizzes on the reading. We had to do endless DBQ's and our history tests left our hands literally aching, if we had done well. We had many tests, and some of those were (oh no, don't say it) scan-tron. School could be boring, and difficult, and long. And what came of all this? Well, let's see. I went to college, I did well, I graduated, I got a job, I did well, I got another job, I did well, I went back to school. In reality I am not an incredible genius, even though I tell people that I am (actually, I might be). The fact is that I am well-educated. And many of my classmates are also well-educated. And I don't see why we have to abandon all those methods of instruction that obviously worked for us just because now we're talking about black and Hispanic kids from the city instead of white kids from the suburbs.

(From Oh, snap!)

A version of this news article first appeared in the Blogboard blog.

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