Blog

Your Education Road Map

Politics K-12

Betsy DeVos. Donald Trump. The Every Student Succeeds Act. Congress. State chiefs. School spending. Elections. Education Week reporters keep watch on education policy and politics in the nation’s capital and in the states.

Education

Report: Homeless Students Less Likely to Graduate Than Other Low-Income Children

By Alyson Klein — February 14, 2019 1 min read

Homeless students are less likely to graduate from high school than other low-income children, and the general population, according to a nonprofit group’s analysis released Thursday.

Education Leads Home, a national campaign focused on improving outcomes for homeless children, analyzed graduation rate data for the 2016-17 school year in 26 states. It found that just 64 percent of homeless students graduate from high school, compared to a national average of 77.6 percent for low-income students and 84.1 percent for all students.

We will be gettting more data on homeless student performance soon. The Every Student Succeeds Act for the first time requires states to break out test performance for homeless students, military-connected children, and foster children.Graduation rates for the 2017-18 school year will be available next year.

This 2016-17 school year saw the highest number of homeless students enrolled in public schools on record, according to a press release on the data from Education Leads Home. That could be because more states are doing a better job of tracking which students are homeless. “For this reason, it is also worth considering that states reporting higher numbers of homeless students or lower graduation rates may actually be the states that are taking the problem most seriously,” the release notes.

Education Leads Home is a collaboration among nonprofits including the SchoolHouse Connection, Civic, the Institute for Children, Poverty and Homelessness, and America’s Promise Alliance.

Image: Getty Images


Follow us on Twitter at @PoliticsK12.

Related Tags:

Let us know what you think!

We’re looking for feedback on our new site to make sure we continue to provide you the best experience.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Future of Work Webinar
Digital Literacy Strategies to Promote Equity
Our new world has only increased our students’ dependence on technology. This makes digital literacy no longer a “nice to have” but a “need to have.” How do we ensure that every student can navigate
Content provided by Learning.com
Mathematics Online Summit Teaching Math in a Pandemic
Attend this online summit to ask questions about how COVID-19 has affected achievement, instruction, assessment, and engagement in math.
School & District Management Webinar Examining the Evidence: Catching Kids Up at a Distance
As districts, schools, and families navigate a new normal following the abrupt end of in-person schooling this spring, students’ learning opportunities vary enormously across the nation. Access to devices and broadband internet and a secure

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Project Manager
United States
K12 Inc.
High School Permanent Substitute Teacher
Woolwich Township, NJ, US
Kingsway Regional School District
MS STEM Teacher
Woolwich Township, NJ, US
Kingsway Regional School District
Speech Therapist - Long Term Sub
Woolwich Township, NJ, US
Kingsway Regional School District

Read Next

Education Obituary In Memory of Michele Molnar, EdWeek Market Brief Writer and Editor
EdWeek Market Brief Associate Editor Michele Molnar, who was instrumental in launching the publication, succumbed to cancer.
5 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: December 9, 2020
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: Stories You May Have Missed
A collection of articles from the previous week that you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: Stories You May Have Missed
A collection of stories from the previous week that you may have missed.
8 min read