Opinion
Education Opinion

Curmudgucation Digest (December 14)

By Peter Greene — December 14, 2014 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

After a week in Seattle to meet my new grandson, I’m finally back up to speed. Here are the choice parts from the past two weeks.

Forbes Fab Five by Five (Part I)

Forbes Fab Five by Five (Part II)

Forbes decided to gather some reformy bigwigs to decide what it would actually cost to really redo the ed system. Then they gathered five bigwigs (Weingarten, Duncan, Cuomo, Handerson and Paul Tudor Jones) together to talk about the results. Expensive and awful.

Common Core Testing Ignore Common Core

All it takes is a quick look at some ELA standards to realize that whatever the Big Test is measuring, it isn’t those standards.

What David Coleman Doesn’t Know about Literature

David Coleman tries to provide instruction on how to teach literature. He’s really not very good at this.

Holding the Baby

Getting up at Dark O’Clock with the grandson gives me an opportunity to reflect.

Ask Arne: Testing and Accountability

Duncan’s back with another video. In this one, he once again appears not to understand the results of his own policies.

John King Joins DOPE

John King is leaving NY for DC, and that tells us as much about DC as it does about King.

Homeostasis, Tourists, Stability and the Feds

Andy Smarick is concerned that homeostasis shows its face in the growing retreat from reformsterism. I suggest that there’s another explanation-- they never built anything to last in the first place.

Beware Cost-Per-Student Stats

When people start throwing around cost-per-student stats, make sure you know what they’re really talking about.

Charters Break the American Promise

Wither Disruptive Students

Fordham’s Mike Petrilli set off a chorus of responses with his NYT piece this week, inclukding two from me. In the first, I argue that his vision of charters is a violation of the American promise to students. In the second, I answer his question about what to do with problem children.

Chicago Schools Caught Cooking Charter Books

Charter school test results not showing enough growth? Just change the numbers.

Ohio Schools Must Get Religion

Ohio’s Governor Kasich thinks that they need to get faith-based organizations into schools to let students know what the Good Lord’s plan for each child is. Sure, that shouldn’t cause any problems at all.

The opinions expressed in View From the Cheap Seats are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Events

Classroom Technology Webinar How Pandemic Tech Is (and Is Not) Transforming K-12 Schools
The COVID-19 pandemic—and the resulting rise in virtual learning and big investments in digital learning tools— helped educators propel their technology skills to the next level. Teachers have become more adept at using learning management
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Building Teacher Capacity for Social-Emotional Learning
Set goals that support adult well-being and social-emotional learning: register today!


Content provided by Panorama
Jobs October 2021 Virtual Career Fair for Teachers and K-12 Staff
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Gunman in 2018 Parkland School Massacre Pleads Guilty
A jury will decide whether Nikolas Cruz will be executed for one of the nation’s deadliest school shootings.
3 min read
Annika Dworet and her husband, Mitch Dworet, wipe away tears as their son's name is read aloud during Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooter Nikolas Cruz's guilty plea on all 17 counts of premeditated murder and 17 counts of attempted murder in the 2018 shootings, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. on Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. The Dworet's son, Nicholas Dworet, 17, was killed in the massacre.
Annika Dworet and her husband, Mitch Dworet, wipe away tears as their son's name is read aloud during Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooter Nikolas Cruz's guilty plea on all 17 counts of premeditated murder and 17 counts of attempted murder in the 2018 shootings, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. on Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. The Dworet's son, Nicholas Dworet, 17, was killed in the massacre.
Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun Sentinel via AP
Education Briefly Stated: October 20, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Gunman in Parkland School Massacre to Plead Guilty
The gunman who killed 14 students and three staff members at a Florida high school will plead guilty to their murders, his attorneys said.
4 min read
Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz is sworn in before pleading guilty, Friday, Oct. 15, 2021, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on all four criminal counts stemming from his attack on a Broward County jail guard in November 2018, Cruz's lawyers said Friday that he plans to plead guilty to the 2018 massacre at a Parkland high school.
Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz is sworn in before pleading guilty, Friday, Oct. 15, 2021, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on all four criminal counts stemming from his attack on a Broward County jail guard in November 2018, Cruz's lawyers said Friday that he plans to plead guilty to the 2018 massacre at a Parkland high school.
Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun Sentinel via AP
Education California Makes Ethnic Studies a High School Requirement
California is among the first in the nation to require students to take a course in ethnic studies to get a diploma starting in 2029-30.
4 min read
FILE - In this Jan. 22, 2020, file photo, Democratic Assembly members, from left, James Ramos, Chris Holden Jose Medina, and Rudy Salas, Jr., right, huddle during an Assembly session in Sacramento, Calif. Medina's bill to make ethnic studies a high school requirement was signed into law by California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)