Education

News in Brief

April 14, 2004 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Puerto Rico Faces Loss Of Federal Title I Aid

Puerto Rico stands to lose nearly $110 million in Title I aid for disadvantaged children because of mismanagement, according to a federal audit report issued March 30.

The Department of Education’s inspector general said that $16 million had already reverted to the U.S. Treasury and that another $94 million in lapsed funds would also be lost to Puerto Rico unless the education agency of the island commonwealth could show evidence that it obligated expenses during the grant periods reviewed. The funding is from five Title I grants awarded from Oct. 1, 1997 to July 1, 2001.

In May 2002, the report says, Puerto Rico was designated a “high risk” grantee because of problems with the education agency’s “fiscal and program accountability.” Those included failure to adhere to procurement requirements, lack of proper internal controls, and actions leading to the indictments of the former secretary of education and others.

In a March 12 letter, the Puerto Rico education department said it was “working in cooperation” with federal officials to ensure the reimbursement of the Title I aid to Puerto Rico as quickly as possible.

The commonwealth, the letter said, “has developed a methodology, which has been accepted by [the U.S. Education Department] in recent conversations, which will allow [it] to demonstrate the timely obligation of the Title I grants.”

—Erik W. Robelen

New York City Chided In Federal E-Rate Audit

New York City cannot adequately assure that computers and other equipment purchased with federal “E- rate” discounts for telecommunications are being used for their intended purposes, as required by law, an audit by the inspector general’s office of the federal Department of Education says.

The March 30 report says New York City lacks controls over its inventory of school computers and related equipment bought with federal funds, based on a sample of 12 schools that received a combined $536,566 in federally subsidized technology.

Federal auditors found that the schools did not consistently maintain records that identified the source of the property and the percentage of federal participation in its cost, as required by federal regulations. The report advises that the Education Department require city school administrators to adopt comprehensive policies and procedures for keeping inventories of computers and related equipment bought with federal money.

John Wall, the finance administrator of the 1.1 million-student New York City school system, responded to the inspector general’s draft report by saying he concurred with the federal recommendation.

"[W]e will continue to reinforce the procedures necessary for the management of equipment,” Mr. Wall wrote in a March 15 letter to the federal department.

—Andrew Trotter

Events

Classroom Technology Webinar How Pandemic Tech Is (and Is Not) Transforming K-12 Schools
The COVID-19 pandemic—and the resulting rise in virtual learning and big investments in digital learning tools— helped educators propel their technology skills to the next level. Teachers have become more adept at using learning management
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Building Teacher Capacity for Social-Emotional Learning
Set goals that support adult well-being and social-emotional learning: register today!


Content provided by Panorama
Jobs October 2021 Virtual Career Fair for Teachers and K-12 Staff
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Tiny Wrists in Cuffs: How Police Use Force Against Children
An investigation finds children as young as 6 and a disproportionate amount of Black children have been handled forcibly by police officers.
15 min read
Jhaimarion, 10, reacts as he listens to his mother, Krystal Archie talking with an Associated Press reporter in Chicago on Sept. 23, 2021. Archie’s three children were present when police, on two occasions, just 11 weeks apart, kicked open her front door and tore through their home searching for drug suspects. She’d never heard of the people they were hunting. Her oldest child, Savannah was 14 at the time; her youngest, Jhaimarion, was seven. They were ordered to get down on the floor.
Jhaimarion, 10, reacts as he listens to his mother, Krystal Archie talking with an Associated Press reporter in Chicago on Sept. 23, 2021. Archie’s three children were present when police, on two occasions, just 11 weeks apart, kicked open her front door and tore through their home searching for drug suspects. She’d never heard of the people they were hunting. Her oldest child, Savannah was 14 at the time; her youngest, Jhaimarion, was seven. They were ordered to get down on the floor.
Nam Y. Huh/AP
Education Gunman in 2018 Parkland School Massacre Pleads Guilty
A jury will decide whether Nikolas Cruz will be executed for one of the nation’s deadliest school shootings.
3 min read
Annika Dworet and her husband, Mitch Dworet, wipe away tears as their son's name is read aloud during Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooter Nikolas Cruz's guilty plea on all 17 counts of premeditated murder and 17 counts of attempted murder in the 2018 shootings, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. on Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. The Dworet's son, Nicholas Dworet, 17, was killed in the massacre.
Annika Dworet and her husband, Mitch Dworet, wipe away tears as their son's name is read aloud during Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooter Nikolas Cruz's guilty plea on all 17 counts of premeditated murder and 17 counts of attempted murder in the 2018 shootings, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. on Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. The Dworet's son, Nicholas Dworet, 17, was killed in the massacre.
Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun Sentinel via AP
Education Briefly Stated: October 20, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Gunman in Parkland School Massacre to Plead Guilty
The gunman who killed 14 students and three staff members at a Florida high school will plead guilty to their murders, his attorneys said.
4 min read
Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz is sworn in before pleading guilty, Friday, Oct. 15, 2021, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on all four criminal counts stemming from his attack on a Broward County jail guard in November 2018, Cruz's lawyers said Friday that he plans to plead guilty to the 2018 massacre at a Parkland high school.
Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz is sworn in before pleading guilty, Friday, Oct. 15, 2021, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on all four criminal counts stemming from his attack on a Broward County jail guard in November 2018, Cruz's lawyers said Friday that he plans to plead guilty to the 2018 massacre at a Parkland high school.
Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun Sentinel via AP