Education

Honors & Awards

May 14, 2003 6 min read
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College Board Inspiration Awards

The College Board recently honored three high schools with their 2003 Inspiration Awards. The awards recognize schools for their efforts to help disadvantaged students enroll in college.

Each school received a $25,000 prize. In addition, five schools received honorable mentions and $1,000 awards. The winners are listed below.

Marshall Fundamental Secondary School, Pasadena, Calif.; Tri-Cities High School, East Point, Ga.; W.T. White High School, Dallas.

Honorable mention: Edinburg North High School, Edinburg, Texas; Galena Park High School, Galena Park, Texas; George W. Fowler High School, Syracuse, NY; Roff High School, Roff, Okla.; Santa Maria High School, Santa Maria, Calif.

ISTE Online Learning Awards

The International Society for Technology in Education’s Special Interest Group for Telelearning has honored three educators with their 2002-2003 Online Learning Awards. The awards recognize educators for pioneeering uses of “telelearning” in grades K-20.

The winners each received memberships in the ISTE and the “telelearning” special-interest group, and were given invitations to present their projects at the 2003 National Educational Computing Conference in Seattle. The winners are listed below.

First Place: Gord Hambly and Erica Raie, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, UnExpected Teaching and Learning: Adventures with Young People.

Second Place: Marion Rex, Spruce Grove, Alberta, Sharing the Dance.

Third Place: Derek Rakowski, Calgary, Alberta, The UPLIFTS Project.

Honorable Mention: Michelle Speight, Calgary Alberta, Museum Connections-Learning Through Our Museums; Gail Boddy, Wichita, Kan., Middle School Online: Blackboard History of Computers; Bertha Yagos, Lundbreck, Alberta, Family Treasures; J.D. Birchmeier, Lansing, Mich., Human Space Exploration.

Award of Special Merit: Emily, Sarah, and Elise Boyd, Waratah, New South Wales, MatMice: Free Homepages For Kids.

Grammy Signature Schools Award

The Grammy Foundation, the Santa Monica, Calif.-based nonprofit arm of the Recording Academy, and soft drink provider Dr. Pepper/ 7 UP Inc., based in Plano, Texas, recently honored 50 schools with their 2003 Grammy Signature Schools Awards.

The awards recognize public high schools nationwide that have successfully supported and maintained arts and music programs despite tough economic challenges.

All of the schools received certificates of recognition and $1000 grants toward their programs. In addition, six schools were named “Gold” schools and received additional $5,000 grants. Two schools were honored as Special Merit schools, receiving additional $1,000 grants, and one school was honored as having the top program in the country, receiving a grand-prize grant of $7,000.

The winners are listed by category in alphabetical order.

National Grammy Signature School: Klein Forest High School, Houston.

Grammy Signature Schools Gold: Booker T. Washington High School for the Visual and Performing Arts, Dallas; High School for the Performing and Visual Arts, Houston; Huron High School, Ann Arbor, Mich; Las Vegas Academy of International Studies, Performing and Visual Arts, Las Vegas; Neuqua Valley High School, Naperville, Ill.; West High School, Iowa City, Iowa.

Grammy Signature Schools Special Merit: Spectrum Community Schools, Kingston, Wash.; Hunter College High School, New York City.

Grammy Signature Schools: Ann Arbor Pioneer High School, Ann Arbor, Mich.; Arapahoe High School, Littleton, Colo.; Arcadia High School, Arcadia, Calif.; Auburn High School, Auburn, Wash.; Centennial High School, Las Vegas; Clarence Senior High School, Clarence, N.Y.; Chugiak High School, Eagle River, Alaska; East Islip High School, Islip Terrace, N.Y.; Easton Area High School, Easton, Pa.; Farmingdale High School, Farmingdale, N.Y.; Folsom High School, Folsom, Calif.; Fremont High School, Fremont, Neb.; Glendale High School, Springfield, Mo.; Great Neck South High School, Great Neck, N.Y.; Harwood Union High School, S. Duxbury, Vt.; Helix Charter High School, La Mesa, Calif.; Herricks High School, New Hyde Park, N.Y.; Highland High School, Salt Lake City; Jenison High School, Jenison, Mich.; John F. Kennedy High School, Cedar Rapids, Iowa; Johnson City High School, Johnson City, N.Y.; J.P. Travavella High School, Coral Springs, Fla.; Langham Creek High School, Houston; Liberty High School, Eldersburg, Md.; Lincoln High School, Thief River Falls, Minn.; Long Beach Polytechnic High School, Long Beach, Calif.; Longmeadow High School, Longmeadow, Mass.; Los Angeles County High School for the Arts, Los Angeles; Mercer Island High School, Mercer Island, Wash.; Mira Costa High School, Manhattan Beach, Calif.; Niles North High School, Skokie, Ill.; Northport High School, Northport, N.Y.; Palmdale High School, Palmdale, Calif.; Park Hill South High School, Riverside, Mo.; Sayville High School, Sayville, N.Y.; Wachusett Regional High School, Holden, Mass.; Walter Johnson High School, Bethesda, Md.; Ward Melville High School, Setauket, N.Y.; Washington Township High School, Sewell, N.J.; Waubonsie Valley High School, Aurora, Ill.; Wayland High School, Wayland, Mass.; Westborough High School, Westborough, Mass.; Wooster High School, Wooster, Mass.

NASDAQ National Teaching Awards

The Nasdaq Stock Market Educational Foundation, a nonprofit organization based in Washington, and the National Council on Economic Education, a nonprofit organization based in Deer Park, N.Y., honored five educators as regional winners of their National Teaching Awards.

The awards honor high school teachers for using creative techniques to improve student knowledge of financial markets, the principles of investing, and personal finance. Each regional winner received a cash prize of $10,000. One regional winner was named as the national winner and received an additional $15,000 cash prize. The winners are listed below.

National Winner: Diane R. Neylan, John F. Kennedy High School, Richmond, Va.

Regional Winners: Cynthia Cardwell, Lincoln Junior High School, Bentonville, Ark.; Judith G. Heine, Canton High School, Medfield, Mass.; William D. Mittlefehldt, Anoka High School, Anoka, Minn.; Joanne Hifumi Ringor, Governor Wallace Rider Farrington High School, Honolulu.

Science Teacher and Principal Awards

The Ciba Speciality Chemicals Foundation, based in White Plains, N.Y., in partnership with the National Science Teachers Association and the Council for Elementary Science International, recently honored five educators at the NSTA annual convention with the Exemplary Science Teacher and Exemplary Science Principal Awards.

The awards recognize elementary, middle, and high school educators who develop creative classroom teaching materials, community programs, staff leadership and support in the development of science, and techniques that improve science instruction. Awardees receive $1,000 cash prizes, honorary memberships in the NSTA and the CESI, and up to $500 in convention travel expenses. The winners are listed below.

Exemplary Science Teacher: Laverne Hamlin, Armstrong High School, Richmond, Va.; Linda S. Harrelson, Codington Elementary School, Wilmington, N.C.; Jennifer Linrud, Wichita Collegiate Middle School, Witchita, Kan.

Exemplary Science Principal: Robert E. Burke, Chattahoochee High School, Alpharetta, Ga.; Janis Wingate Stewart, Meadowview Elementary School, Selma, Ala.

Other Honors and Awards

Dan Cabrol, an 8th grade science teacher at Wheatland Middle School in Lancaster, Pa., recently received the Walmart Teacher of the Year Award.

The award recognizes teachers who excel in their subject areas and provide students with high-quality learning opportunities. Mr. Cabrol was presented a plaque and $1,000 for his school at a May 6 ceremony.

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