Education

Downhill in D.C.?

By Vaishali Honawar — August 08, 2008 1 min read

The D.C. imbroglio over Chancellor Michelle Rhee’s proposed plan to boost the salaries of teachers willing to give up tenure rights has been like watching a nail-biting show on performance pay unfold.

Only now it could be headed off the cliff.

The proposal from the district would more than double some teachers’ salaries over a period of five years if they agree to go on probation for a year. For instance, a teacher with 10 years of service could see his or her annual salary go from $56,200 to as much as $122,500. Gasp!

Of course, during this one year, the teacher could be fired, which would bring that salary down to a big fat zero.

Yesterday, Washington Teachers Union President George Parker ruled out the possibility that teachers would accept the plan. The “tenure issue,” he told the Associated Press, is going to be the determining factor. And he wants it taken off the table.

The city and the union, Mr. Parker said, might have to settle for some kind of “traditional agreement.”

If that happens, I for one want my ticket money back.

A version of this news article first appeared in the Teacher Beat blog.