Find your next job fast at the Jan. 28 Virtual Career Fair. Register now.
Education Report Roundup

Chicago Study Shows Barriers to College

By Catherine Gewertz — March 18, 2008 1 min read

From High School to the Future: Potholes on the Way to College

Only 41 percent of Chicago high school students who say they want to attend a four-year college actually manage to enroll the fall after graduation, a figure that drops to 30 percent among Latino students, a study has found.

The report, released last week by the Consortium on Chicago School Research, is the second in a series of dispatches from an ongoing study of the postsecondary experiences of the district’s students. The research project seeks to identify the stumbling blocks students encounter in trying to go to college.

Researchers found that Latino students were the least likely to plan to go to college, or to apply. Only 60 percent of those who said they aspired to attend a four-year college actually planned to enroll the fall after graduation, compared with 77 percent of African-American and 76 percent of white students.

‘Potholes’ in the Road

Among Chicago seniors who aspired to complete a four-year college degree, only about 60 percent actually applied to higher education.

28brief c1s

SOURCE: Consortium on Chicago School Research

In 2005, 83 percent of all Chicago high school seniors said they wanted to earn a bachelor’s degree or higher, the study found. But only 59 percent of those students—and just 46 percent among Latinos—actually applied.

Schools with a “strong college-going culture” were “the single most consistent predictor” of whether students took the necessary steps to apply to and enroll in college, the researchers write.

The 409,000-student Chicago school district said it would create a class that helps students complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. The form is used to determine eligibility for government grants and loans, and many types of college-based financial assistance. The study found that not filing a FAFSA is a key barrier to college enrollment.

See Also

For background, previous stories, and Web links, read College Access.

A version of this article appeared in the March 19, 2008 edition of Education Week

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Branding Matters. Learn From the Pros Why and How
Learn directly from the pros why K-12 branding and marketing matters, and how to do it effectively.
Content provided by EdWeek Top School Jobs
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
How to Make Learning More Interactive From Anywhere
Join experts from Samsung and Boxlight to learn how to make learning more interactive from anywhere.
Content provided by Samsung
Teaching Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table With Education Week: How Educators Can Respond to a Post-Truth Era
How do educators break through the noise of disinformation to teach lessons grounded in objective truth? Join to find out.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Director of Information Technology
Montpelier, Vermont
Washington Central UUSD
Great Oaks AmeriCorps Fellow August 2021 - June 2022
New York City, New York (US)
Great Oaks Charter Schools
Director of Athletics
Farmington, Connecticut
Farmington Public Schools
Head of Lower School
San Diego, California
San Diego Jewish Academy

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: January 13, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Obituary In Memory of Michele Molnar, EdWeek Market Brief Writer and Editor
EdWeek Market Brief Associate Editor Michele Molnar, who was instrumental in launching the publication, succumbed to cancer.
5 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: December 9, 2020
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated Briefly Stated: Stories You May Have Missed
A collection of articles from the previous week that you may have missed.
8 min read