November 4, 2009

This Issue
Vol. 29, Issue 10
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Proficiency standards became less rigorous from 2005 to 2007 in a number of states, says a study by the National Center for Education Statistics.
States and school districts already worry about how they’ll fill the budget gap once federal stimulus aid runs out.
Addressing an issue facing schools nationwide, Louisiana is requiring educators to document certain types of electronic contact with students.
A literacy group says that many of the writers are "representatives of multiple commercial entities that stand to profit."
News in Brief
Obituary
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
News in Brief
Report Roundup
Most students were sent to low-performing schools like those they left, and performed no better in their new ones, a study finds.
New rules will give parents of children in low-performing schools the power to open up targeted schools for outside management.
Rural schools are more diverse and need more help from programs for disadvantaged students than they typically receive, a new report says.
Policy experts say the state lacks comprehensive human-resources policies for principals.
Statistics used to make the case that the United States no longer leads the world in higher education are “a mess,” a scholar argues.
A forum at the Internet company focused on ways to use technology to improve schools.
Best of the Blogs
Britain’s former Prime Minister joined the U.S. Education Secretary in touting the role of school as a social anchor.
The money-saving school closures have begun amid legal challenges, parent protests, and general uncertainty.
Policy Brief
As concern over teenagers' reading and writing skills mounts, an Alabama high school shows how to teach literacy in every subject.
We shouldn't compel every child to stay in school for longer days or longer years just because some may need to, writes Peter Berger.
Professional development by lecture is doomed, writes Ross Hunefeld, and should be replaced by teacher-led learning communities.
Letters
Letters
Letters
William G. Ouchi writes that true decentralization is hard to implement, seldom put in place, but effective when it is.
FOUNDATION SUPPORT: Coverage of specific topics in Education Week is supported in part by grants from the Annenberg Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Pew Charitable Trusts, the Spencer Foundation, the Wallace Foundation, and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The newspaper retains sole editorial control over the content of the articles that are underwritten by the foundations.

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