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Officials of the Gannett Foundation have announced the award of a $1-million grant to the Challenger Center for Space-Science Education.

The grant will double the budget for the center, which was established last year by the surviving families of the seven astronauts killed aboard the space shuttle Challenger.

The grant--of which half was awarded immediately and half is to be matched by contributions from other donors--will enable the center to develop curricular materials and to begin planning the construction of facilities.

The center's "flagship" facility will be at an as yet undetermined site in Washington; a "satellite" facility is planned for Houston.

The president of the center is to be David L. Winstead, former executive director of the Washington/Baltimore Regional Association, a nonprofit alliance of businesses. Previously, Mr. Winstead had served as a special assistant to former Senator Charles McC. Mathias of Maryland.

Center officials say they hope to raise $30 million over the next five years for the program, which is aimed at promoting education in the space sciences through interactive learning, including simulated space flight.


School districts will have until Dec. 1 to decide whether to remain in a voluntary nationwide class action for the resolution of millions of dollars in compensatory- and punitive-damage claims against asbestos manufacturers.

Lawyers involved in the case said last week that all districts would soon receive a letter that outlines their options.

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