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With four victories and two setbacks, the federal government is apparently moving forward in its effort to compel young men to comply with the draft-registration laws.

On Oct. 4, a federal district judge in San Diego sentenced Benjamin H. Sasway, a 21-year-old former college student, to two and a half years in prison. Mr. Sasway was convicted on Aug. 26 of failure to register for the draft.

One day after Mr. Sasway was sentenced, Mark A. Schmucker, a 22-year-old student at Goshen College, was convicted on the same charge by a federal-court jury in Cleveland. Mr. Schmucker's sentencing has been scheduled for Oct. 19.

Then, on Oct. 6, the student government president at University of Northern Iowa, Rusty Martin, 22, was indicted by a federal grand jury in Cedar Rapids of failure to register.

The maximum penalty for failing to register is five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. The law requires young men to sign up for the draft at a post office within 30 days of their 18th birthday.

The Selective Service System announced last week that successful prosecutions, such as those of Mr. Sasway and Mr. Schmucker, have helped boost the rate of compliance with the two-year-old law to 94.2 percent.

According to the draft agency, approximately 500,000 men remain in violation of the law.

But of those men who did register, 85 percent who subsequently changed addresses failed to notify the Selective Service of their new address, according to a report released by the General Accounting Office.

Hence, if a draft were instituted, 20-to-40 percent of all draft registrants might not receive military induction notices, the report said.

Additional prosecutions of draft-registration evaders might be affected by the outcome of a federal district judge's ruling in Los Angeles on Oct. 1. Judge Terry Hatter said that he would dismiss the Justice Department's case against David Wayte, a 21-year-old student from Pasadena, if it failed to prove that he had not been unfairly singled out for prosecution from the thousands of other nonregistrants. Mr. Wayte's trial has been set for Oct. 12.


Acknowledging that efforts to reduce drug abuse through law-enforcement efforts have met with only limited success, the Reagan Administration last week expanded its campaign against drug abuse to include education programs and the involvement of the private sector.

Dr. Carlton Turner, the White House adviser on drug-abuse policy, said the broad campaign would include federal agencies, parent groups, and "major organized efforts" in each state.

The business community would be encouraged to develop programs to combat alcoholism and drug abuse, he said.

For young people, Dr. Turner said the Administration's approach would be "to tell [them] what exactly we do know and to enlist the aid of the young people themselves."

The program would make an effort to reduce high-school seniors' daily drug use, and it would attempt to reduce drug use in the military.


In the second stage of a program to reward improvement in urban high schools, the Ford Foundation last week named the 50 winners of $20,000 grants to enrich school programs.

The $1-million disbursement is part of the foundation's three-stage City High School Recognition Program, established earlier this year. (See Education Week, Feb. 10, 1982.)

Each of the winning schools, located in 30 cities across the country, will use the grant money to expand their educational offerings through a particular project. The projects include strengthening mathematics and English teaching, providing peer tutoring, computer training, and remedial instruction, and expanding vocational and extracurricular programs.

The schools were selected from 107 urban high schools that had submitted proposals to the foundation after receiving $1,000 "recognition awards" in the first stage of the program last May. Those schools were selected from a group of 225 that the foundation had invited to apply for the grants.

To qualify, a high school had to be comprehensive, to enroll 30 percent of its students from low-income families, and to have no special entrance requirements.

For the third stage of the grant program, the foundation will compile case studies of 25 of the schools judged to have outstanding programs.

Announcing the recent round of awards, Edward J. Meade, program officer for the foundation, said:

"I can think of no other institution in the American city that is expected to do so much for so many as the general, or comprehensive, high school. As we saw in the first stage of the City High School Recognition Program, many of these schools are succeeding in their multiple responsibilities to a greater extent than they are generally given credit for."

Following are the names and locations of the 50 high schools that received the awards.

Albuquerque, N.M.: Rio Grande High School; Atlanta: Carver High School, Fulton High School; Baltimore: Edmondson High School, Northern High School, Walbrook High School; Birmingham, Ala.: Carol W. Hayes High School, Glen High School, Parker High School, Phillips High School; Charlotte, N.C.: Harry P. Harding High School; Columbus, Ohio: Linden McKinley High School; Des Moines: Des Moines Technical High School; Detroit: Central High School, Murray-Wright High School, Northern High School, Southwestern High School, Western High School; Houston: Booker T. Washington High School; Indianapolis: Arsenal Technical High School, George Washington High School; Jackson, Miss.: Murrah High School; Jersey City, N.J.: Lincoln High School; Kansas City, Mo.: Kansas City East High School; Knoxville, Tenn.: Rule High School; Memphis: Carver High School; Milwaukee: Solomon Juneau High School, South Division High School; New Orleans: Clark High School, George Washington Carver High School; Norfolk, Va.: Granby High School, Lake Taylor High School, Maury High School; Oakland, Calif.: Castlemont High School, Fremont High School; Omaha: Benson High School, Technical High School; Pittsburgh: South High School; Portland, Ore.: Jefferson High School; Providence, R.I.: Providence Central High School; San Antonio: Luther Burbank High School, Sidney Lanier High School, Phillis Wheatley High School; Seattle: Chief Sealth High School; Syracuse, N.Y.: George W. Fowler High School; Tampa, Fla.: Thomas Jefferson High School; Tucson, Ariz.: Pueblo High School; Washington, D.C.: Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, Spingarn High School; Worcester, Mass.: Burncoat High School.


With four victories and two setbacks, the federal government is apparently moving forward in its effort to compel young men to comply with the draft-registration laws.

On Oct. 4, a federal district judge in San Diego sentenced Benjamin H. Sasway, a 21-year-old former college student, to two and a half years in prison. Mr. Sasway was convicted on Aug. 26 of failure to register for the draft.

One day after Mr. Sasway was sentenced, Mark A. Schmucker, a 22-year-old student at Goshen College, was convicted on the same charge by a federal-court jury in Cleveland. Mr. Schmucker's sentencing has been scheduled for Oct. 19.

Then, on Oct. 6, the student government president at University of Northern Iowa, Rusty Martin, 22, was indicted by a federal grand jury in Cedar Rapids of failure to register.

The maximum penalty for failing to register is five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. The law requires young men to sign up for the draft at a post office within 30 days of their 18th birthday.

The Selective Service System announced last week that successful prosecutions, such as those of Mr. Sasway and Mr. Schmucker, have helped boost the rate of compliance with the two-year-old law to 94.2 percent.

According to the draft agency, approximately 500,000 men remain in violation of the law.

But of those men who did register, 85 percent who subsequently changed addresses failed to notify the Selective Service of their new address, according to a report released by the General Accounting Office. Hence, if a draft were instituted, 20-to-40 percent of all draft registrants might not receive military induction notices, the report said.

Additional prosecutions of draft-registration evaders might be affected by the outcome of a federal district judge's ruling in Los Angeles on Oct. 1. Judge Terry Hatter said that he would dismiss the Justice Department's case against David Wayte, a 21-year-old student from Pasadena, if it failed to prove that he had not been unfairly singled out for prosecution from the thousands of other nonregistrants. Mr. Wayte's trial has been set for Oct. 12.


New Campaign Against Drug Abuse Set By White House


Acknowledging that efforts to reduce drug abuse through law-enforcement efforts have met with only limited success, the Reagan Administration last week expanded its campaign against drug abuse to include education programs and the involvement of the private sector.

Dr. Carlton Turner, the White House adviser on drug-abuse policy, said the broad campaign would include federal agencies, parent groups, and "major organized efforts" in each state.

The business community would be encouraged to develop programs to combat alcoholism and drug abuse, he said.

For young people, Dr. Turner said the Administration's approach would be "to tell [them] what exactly we do know and to enlist the aid of the young people themselves."

The program would seek to reduce by 30 percent the daily drug use by high school seniors, and it would attempt to reduce drug use in the military.

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