Law and Courts

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Mrs. Ella J. Rice talks to one of her pupils, all of whom are white, in a 3rd grade classroom of the Draper Elementary School in southeast Washington, D.C., September 13, 1954. This was the first day of non-segregated schools for both teachers and pupils in the District of Columbia public school system. Mrs. Rice was the only black teacher in the school.
—AP

65 Years After 'Brown v. Board,' Where Are All the Black Educators?

The landmark Supreme Court decision that integrated schools 65 years ago had an unintended effect that’s still felt today: Thousands of black teachers and principals lost their jobs. (May 14, 2019)


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07/17 07:32 am | Retired Justice John Paul Stevens, a Voice for Student Rights, Dies at 99 | Stevens served 34 years on the U.S. Supreme Court, ruling for student rights, racial equality, and a high wall of separation between church and state.

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The labor groups have lost members since last year’s Janus Supreme Court case, but not as many as anticipated. Is that because the unions have reenergized teachers, or because teachers don’t understand their rights?
June 27, 2019 – Education Week
A former Atlanta Public Schools teacher convicted in the notorious 2015 cheating trial has been released from prison about 15 months before the end of her two-year prison sentence.
June 25, 2019 – McClatchy-Tribune
The father of a victim of the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre has won a defamation lawsuit against the authors of a book that claimed the shooting never happened—the latest victory for victims' relatives who have been taking a more aggressive stance against conspiracy theorists.
June 18, 2019 – AP
A California teacher battling breast cancer made headlines recently when she was told state law required her to pay for the cost of a sub during her treatment. Where else are these kinds of sick leave policies in place? And why aren’t the unions doing more to fight them?
May 17, 2019 – Education Week
The landmark Supreme Court decision that integrated schools 65 years ago had an unintended effect that’s still felt today: Thousands of black teachers and principals lost their jobs.
May 14, 2019 – Education Week
Dispute over a proposed citizenship question on the 2020 census gets a hearing before the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday April 23, with many school groups watching closely for the impact it could have on funding.
May 1, 2019 – Education Week
One mother’s complaint to the state of Oklahoma regarding her child prompts a state order affecting students with disabilities throughout Tulsa.
May 1, 2019 – Education Week
Count educators as part of the population taking a keen interest in a major U.S. Supreme Court case about whether President Donald Trump's administration properly added a question about U.S. citizenship to the 2020 census.
April 17, 2019 – Education Week
Already home to a thriving ecosystem of private school choice, the state’s lawmakers want vouchers for thousands of new students.
April 17, 2019 – Education Week
What goes on behind all the closed doors in politics? Most teachers never get a chance to find out, writes teacher-turned-politician John Waldron.
April 11, 2019 – Education Week

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