Find your next job fast at the Jan. 28 Virtual Career Fair. Register now.
Teaching Profession

Striking Detroit Teachers Ignore Judge’s Order To Go Back to Work

By Vaishali Honawar — September 11, 2006 1 min read

Teachers in Detroit continued to picket today in defiance of a judge’s order demanding they go back to school, throwing into uncertainty an administration plan to reopen schools tomorrow.

“An overwhelming majority of our teachers did not show up to work,” said Lekan Oguntoyinbo, a spokesman for the district, adding that the reopening of the schools, slated for Tuesday, is now “in flux.” He said the district might return to court tomorrow to ask the judge to hold the teachers in contempt.

Negotiations between the two sides continued Monday, as the strike entered its 15th day.

Schools in Detroit opened Sept. 5 for a half day before closing indefinitely after just 27,000 of the expected 120,000 students showed up.

On Sept. 8, Wayne County Circuit Court Judge Susan Borman ordered striking teachers back to work. She said she believed district officials, who testified that students were leaving city schools for suburban and charter schools, further hurting the district’s financial situation. The school system is grappling with a $105 million budget shortfall in its $1.4 billion budget for 2006-07.

In a statement released today, schools Superintendent William F. Coleman III said the administration’s latest proposal to the teachers includes a wage increase in the second and third years of the contract, adding up to a total of 3.5 percent.

The district had originally asked teachers to take a 5.5 percent pay cut, but teachers want a 5 percent increase each year over the next three years.

“Although the parties are apart, we are not far apart. We believe we have made significant progress over the last two and a half weeks,” Mr. Coleman said.

Meanwhile, Gov. Jennifer M. Granholm, a Democrat, has indicated that if the two sides fail to reach a decision by 6 p.m. today, she will send in the Michigan Employment Relations Commission to help sort out their differences.

Events

Teaching Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table With Education Week: How Educators Can Respond to a Post-Truth Era
How do educators break through the noise of disinformation to teach lessons grounded in objective truth? Join to find out.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
The 4 Biggest Challenges of MTSS During Remote Learning: How Districts Are Adapting
Leaders share ways they have overcome the biggest obstacles of adapting a MTSS or RTI framework in a hybrid or remote learning environment.
Content provided by Panorama Education
Student Well-Being Online Summit Keeping Students and Teachers Motivated and Engaged
Join experts to learn how to address teacher morale, identify students with low engagement, and share what is working in remote learning.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Join us for our NBOE 2021 Winter Teacher Virtual Interview Fair!
Newark, New Jersey
Newark Public Schools
Special Education Teacher
Chicago, Illinois
JCFS Chicago
Assistant Director of Technical Solutions
Working from home
EdGems Math LLC

Read Next

Teaching Profession Here Are the Four Finalists for 2021 National Teacher of the Year
The four finalists for the 2021 National Teacher of the Year challenge inequities both in their school communities and on a national level.
5 min read
From left: John Arthur (Utah), Alejandro Diasgranados (D.C.), Maureen Stover (N.C.), Juliana Urtubey (Nev.)
From left: John Arthur (Utah), Alejandro Diasgranados (D.C.), Maureen Stover (N.C.), Juliana Urtubey (Nev.)
Courtesy of CCSSO
Teaching Profession Has the Public Turned on Teachers?
The rift over when school buildings should reopen has caused teachers to feel like they've lost public support. But have they?
12 min read
Cyndi Pristello, a school wide support teacher at JoAnna Connell Elementary School, greets students and their families on April 18, 2020, as they drive through the school's parking lot during a drive-by parade. The school will begin online classes on April 20 after being closed due to the coronavirus shutdown.
A teacher greets students and families during a drive-by parade in Erie, Penn. Many schools around the country remain closed, and some teachers say they're taking heat for it.
Jack Hanrahan/Erie Times-News via AP
Teaching Profession Chicago Teachers Vote to Continue Remote Teaching
Chicago Teachers Union announced Sunday its members "overwhelmingly" chose to conduct only remote work beginning Monday.
Katherine Rosenberg-Douglas & Bill Ruthhart
4 min read
Elementary 1 teacher Melissa Vozar sits outside of Suder Elementary in Chicago to teach a virtual class on Jan. 11, 2021. The Chicago Teachers Union said that its members voted to defy an order to return to the classroom before they are vaccinated against the coronavirus, setting up a showdown with district officials who have said such a move would amount to an illegal strike.
Elementary 1 teacher Melissa Vozar sits outside of Suder Elementary in Chicago to teach a virtual class on Jan. 11, 2021. The Chicago Teachers Union said that its members voted to defy an order to return to the classroom before they are vaccinated against the coronavirus, setting up a showdown with district officials who have said such a move would amount to an illegal strike.
Anthony Vazquez/Chicago Sun-Times via AP
Teaching Profession After a Stillbirth, This Teacher Was Denied Paid Leave for Recovery. Here's Her Story
A District of Columbia teacher delivered a stillborn baby and was denied paid maternity leave. Her story, told here, is not uncommon.
6 min read
Illustration of a woman.
iStock/Getty