Teaching Profession

Striking Detroit Teachers Ignore Judge’s Order To Go Back to Work

By Vaishali Honawar — September 11, 2006 1 min read

Teachers in Detroit continued to picket today in defiance of a judge’s order demanding they go back to school, throwing into uncertainty an administration plan to reopen schools tomorrow.

“An overwhelming majority of our teachers did not show up to work,” said Lekan Oguntoyinbo, a spokesman for the district, adding that the reopening of the schools, slated for Tuesday, is now “in flux.” He said the district might return to court tomorrow to ask the judge to hold the teachers in contempt.

Negotiations between the two sides continued Monday, as the strike entered its 15th day.

Schools in Detroit opened Sept. 5 for a half day before closing indefinitely after just 27,000 of the expected 120,000 students showed up.

On Sept. 8, Wayne County Circuit Court Judge Susan Borman ordered striking teachers back to work. She said she believed district officials, who testified that students were leaving city schools for suburban and charter schools, further hurting the district’s financial situation. The school system is grappling with a $105 million budget shortfall in its $1.4 billion budget for 2006-07.

In a statement released today, schools Superintendent William F. Coleman III said the administration’s latest proposal to the teachers includes a wage increase in the second and third years of the contract, adding up to a total of 3.5 percent.

The district had originally asked teachers to take a 5.5 percent pay cut, but teachers want a 5 percent increase each year over the next three years.

“Although the parties are apart, we are not far apart. We believe we have made significant progress over the last two and a half weeks,” Mr. Coleman said.

Meanwhile, Gov. Jennifer M. Granholm, a Democrat, has indicated that if the two sides fail to reach a decision by 6 p.m. today, she will send in the Michigan Employment Relations Commission to help sort out their differences.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
A Safe Return to Schools is Possible with Testing
We are edging closer to a nationwide return to in-person learning in the fall. However, vaccinations alone will not get us through this. Young children not being able to vaccinate, the spread of new and
Content provided by BD
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
Meeting the Moment: Accelerating Equitable Recovery and Transformative Change
Educators are deciding how best to re-establish routines such as everyday attendance, rebuild the relationships for resilient school communities, and center teaching and learning to consciously prioritize protecting the health and overall well-being of students
Content provided by Campaign for Grade-Level Reading
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Reading & Literacy Webinar
Addressing Learning Loss: What Schools Need to Accelerate Reading Instruction in K-3
When K-3 students return to classrooms this fall, there will be huge gaps in foundational reading skills. Does your school or district need a plan to address learning loss and accelerate student growth? In this
Content provided by PDX Reading

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Teaching Profession Opinion I've Studied Teachers for 20 Years. The Pandemic Was Their Ultimate Challenge
Researcher Lora Bartlett wondered what was happening behind the scenes as teachers' cheerful voices radiated from her daughters' computers.
Lora Bartlett
4 min read
Opinion Bartlett1 KNOW THYSELF LINCOLN
Lincoln Agnew for Education Week
Teaching Profession Q&A Teachers' Union President: Say 'No to Censorship, and Yes to Teaching the Truth'
National Education Association President Becky Pringle discusses some of the challenges and priorities for the nation's largest teachers' union.
8 min read
National Education Association President Becky Pringle delivers a keynote address.
National Education Association President Becky Pringle delivers a keynote address at the union's representative assembly in early July.
Moses Mitchell/National Education Association
Teaching Profession Opinion How to Improve Teaching After the Pandemic
Figuring out how to let individual teachers do more of what they’re already good at is a powerful place to start the improvement process.
4 min read
Conceptual image of finding finding a different approach or path.
Eoneren/E+
Teaching Profession Teachers' Unions Vow to Defend Members in Critical Race Theory Fight
The National Education Association and the American Federation of Teachers are preparing for litigation as states restrict teaching about racism.
7 min read
In this photo illustration, Randi Weingarten, the president of the American Federation of Teachers, left, and Becky Pringle, the president of the National Education Association, right.
In this photo illustration, Randi Weingarten, the president of the American Federation of Teachers, left, and Becky Pringle, the president of the National Education Association, right.
Courtesy photos