Curriculum

Book Tackles Teacher Ed. For Reading

By Kathleen Kennedy Manzo — January 03, 2006 1 min read

Radical changes are needed in teacher education and professional development to prepare educators to meet students’ literacy needs throughout the K-12 years, the latest in a series of books from the National Academy of Education concludes.

The 304-page book outlines recommendations for infusing preservice programs with essential literacy content and strategies. It also encourages a view of teacher education that evolves throughout educators’ careers and that pairs skilled educators with novice ones.

Get information on how to order the book, Knowledge to Support the Teaching of Reading: Preparing Teachers for a Changing World, from Jossey-Bass.

“Ninety-nine percent of the teachers in middle schools and high schools are prepared to teach in their content area, not to teach comprehension in their content area,” said Catherine E. Snow, an influential reading researcher at Harvard University who chaired the panel that wrote the book.

Preservice programs should incorporate more content on the reading development and instructional needs of students throughout the elementary and secondary grades, and include methods of assessing their reading development and identifying potential problems, the book says. Titled Knowledge to Support the Teaching of Reading: Preparing Teachers for a Changing World, it was edited by Ms. Snow, Peg Griffin, and M. Susan Burns and was released in December.

“Teacher-educators must start working the way excellent teachers work, by imposing on their own profession a recurrent cycle of learning, enactment, assessment, and reflection,” the book says.

Special Emphasis

The group that produced the book, the National Academy of Education’s reading subcommittee, is part of the NAE’s committee on teacher education, a panel of experts that has been working for more than a year to outline a core knowledge base for teachers. The committee on teacher education has placed special emphasis on helping teachers understand and address children’s changing literacy needs, particularly in middle and high schools.

The Washington-based education academy—a private, invitation-only group of distinguished academics—acknowledges that research to determine the best approaches to teacher education in the area of reading is inadequate. But, it says, enough information is available on effective strategies and methods that can be put into practice.

Events

School & District Management Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table With Education Week: What Did We Learn About Schooling Models This Year?
After a year of living with the pandemic, what schooling models might we turn to as we look ahead to improve the student learning experience? Could year-round schooling be one of them? What about online
School & District Management Webinar What's Ahead for Hybrid Learning: Putting Best Practices in Motion
It’s safe to say hybrid learning—a mix of in-person and remote instruction that evolved quickly during the pandemic—is probably here to stay in K-12 education to some extent. That is the case even though increasing
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Mathematics Webinar
Building Equitable Systems: Moving Math From Gatekeeper to Opportunity Gateway
The importance of disrupting traditional American math practices and adopting high-quality math curriculum continues to be essential for changing the trajectory of historically under-resourced schools. Building systems around high-quality math curriculum also is necessary to
Content provided by Partnership for L.A. Schools

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Whitepaper
Educator Survey Results: Meeting the Demands of Hybrid Learning with eBooks
With COVID-19 altering nearly all aspects of daily life, including the way students learn, this survey sought insight from those on the f...
Content provided by OverDrive
Curriculum Opinion Introducing Primary Sources to Students
Five educators share strategies for introducing primary sources to students, including English-language learners.
12 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty
Curriculum Opinion Eight Ways to Teach With Primary Sources
Four educators share ways they use primary sources with students, including a strategy called "Zoom."
13 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty
Curriculum The Dr. Seuss Controversy: What Educators Need to Know
The business that manages Dr. Seuss' work and legacy will cease publishing six books due to racist stereotypes and offensive content.
5 min read
A copy of the book "And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street," by Dr. Seuss, rests in a chair on March 1, 2021, in Walpole, Mass. Dr. Seuss Enterprises, the business that preserves and protects the author and illustrator's legacy, announced on his birthday, Tuesday, March 2, 2021, that it would cease publication of several children's titles including "And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street" and "If I Ran the Zoo," because of insensitive and racist imagery.
Dr. Seuss Enterprises announced it would cease publication of several of the author's children's titles because of insensitive and racist imagery.
Steven Senne/AP