Law & Courts

Justice Dept. to Pay $127.5M to Parkland Massacre Victims’ Families

By Terry Spencer, Miami Herald — November 23, 2021 2 min read
In this Feb. 15, 2018, file photo, law enforcement officers block off the entrance to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., following a deadly shooting at the school.
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The families of most of those killed and wounded in the 2018 massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland announced Monday they have settled their lawsuit against the federal government over the FBI’s failure to stop the gunman even though it had received information he intended to attack.

Attorneys for 16 of the 17 killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland said they had reached a confidential monetary settlement with the government over the FBI’s failure to investigate a tip it received about a month before the massacre; the 17th family chose not to sue.

Miami attorney Stuart Grossman, whose law firm represented five Parkland high school families in the litigation, told the Miami Herald that the total settlement by the U.S. Department of Justice to 40 survivors and families is $127.5 million.

“It has been an honor to represent the Parkland families who, through their immeasurable grief, have devoted themselves to making the world a safer place,” their lead attorney, Kristina Infante, said in a statement. “Although no resolution could ever restore what the Parkland families lost, this settlement marks an important step toward justice.”

Andrew Pollack, whose 18-year-old daughter Meadow died in the shooting, commended the FBI for accepting responsibility for its inaction, comparing it to the Broward County school district and sheriff’s office, the school security staff and the psychologists who treated the shooter. He believes they all failed to stop the shooter and have ducked responsibility.

“The FBI has made changes to make sure this never happens again,” Pollack said.

Tony Montalto, whose 14-year-old daughter Gina died, said no settlement will “replace my bright, bubbly and beautiful daughter.” He said that while other families celebrate Thanksgiving this week, Gina’s chair will remain empty.

Paul David Stern, the lead attorney defending the government, did not immediately return a call seeking comment.

See Also

Butler County Sheriff Deputies stand on the scene at Madison Local Schools, in Madison Township in Butler County, Ohio, after a school shooting on Feb. 29, 2016.
Sheriff deputies were on the scene of a shooting at Madison Local Schools, in Butler County, Ohio, in 2016.
Cara Owsley/The Cincinnati Enquirer via AP

About five weeks before the Feb. 14, 2018, shooting, an FBI tip line received a call saying a former Stoneman Douglas student, Nikolas Cruz, had bought guns and planned to “slip into a school and start shooting the place up.”

“I know he’s going to explode,” the caller told the FBI.

But that information was never forwarded to the FBI’s South Florida office and Cruz was never contacted. He had been expelled from the school a year earlier and had a long history of emotional and behavioral problems.

Cruz, 23, pleaded guilty last month to 17 counts of first-degree murder. He will receive either a death sentence or life in prison after a penalty trial that is scheduled to start in January.

Last month, victims’ families reached a $25 million settlement with the Broward County school district.

Recent Data: School Shootings

Education Week journalists began in 2018 tracking shootings on K-12 school property that resulted in firearm-related injuries or deaths. There is no single right way of calculating numbers like this, and the human toll is impossible to measure. We hope only to provide reliable information to help inform discussions, debates, and paths forward.
Below, you can find big-picture data on school shootings since 2018. (This chart will be updating as new information becomes available.)


See Also: School Shootings This Year: How Many and Where

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Copyright (c) 2021, Miami Herald. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency.

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