Education Funding

Funding Level Divides Legislators, Districts

By Andrew Trotter — June 12, 2007 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

The following offers highlights of the recent legislative sessions. Precollegiate enrollment figures are based on fall 2006 data reported by state officials for public elementary and secondary schools. The figures for precollegiate education spending do not include federal flow-through funds, unless noted.

South Dakota

Increases in school funding by the South Dakota legislature this winter did little to dampen complaints by school districts that education remains underfunded in the state.

Gov. Michael Rounds
Republican
Senate:
15 Democrats
20 Republicans
House:
20 Democrats
50 Republicans
Enrollment:
120,278

Though lawmakers hiked the state’s formula aid for schools by $23.7 million, a 3.8 percent increase, for fiscal 2008, education groups argued that the actual increase will be lower because the legislature did not renew $6.5 million in “one-time” budget money that it gave to school districts last year.

They point out that the state’s teachers are paid the least in the nation—$34,039 on average, compared with the national average of $47,602—according to a national salary survey released by the American Federation of Teachers in March.

About 70 school districts are suing the state, contending that its funding system is inadequate and violates the state constitution.

For 2008, the K-12 budget totals $386.8 million, or 34 percent of the overall state budget of $1.14 billion.

In addition to the state formula, the budget includes other special funding that legislators directed toward K-12 education in the 2007 legislative session, which ended in mid-March, such as a matching program for teacher-compensation assistance, proposed by Gov. Michael Rounds, a Republican, and authorized at $4 million annually for five years. Eligible purposes include signing bonuses or compensating teachers for attending professional-development programs or working on the curriculum.

Gov. Rounds also approved a measure requiring consolidation of school districts in 2009 that do not enroll a minimum of 100 students, with exceptions for districts in “sparse” areas.

Another bill backed by Gov. Rounds requires students to stay in school until age 18, unless they have graduated from high school.

Lawmakers also approved the creation of a state virtual school, which will offer school districts and students more than 60 classes by next fall.

See Also

See other stories on education issues in South Dakota. See data on South Dakota’s public school system.

For more stories on this topic see Finance.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the June 13, 2007 edition of Education Week

Events

Budget & Finance Webinar Staffing Schools After ESSER: What School and District Leaders Need to Know
Join our newsroom for insights on investing in critical student support positions as pandemic funds expire.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Achievement Webinar
How can districts build sustainable tutoring models before the money runs out?
District leaders, low on funds, must decide: broad support for all or deep interventions for few? Let's discuss maximizing tutoring resources.
Content provided by Varsity Tutors for Schools
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
College & Workforce Readiness Webinar
Roundtable Webinar: Why We Created a Portrait of a Graduate
Hear from three K-12 leaders for insights into their school’s Portrait of a Graduate and learn how to create your own.
Content provided by Otus

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Funding When There's More Money for Schools, Is There an 'Objective' Way to Hand It Out?
A fight over the school funding formula in Mississippi is kicking up old debates over how to best target aid.
7 min read
Illustration of many roads and road signs going in different directions with falling money all around.
iStock/Getty
Education Funding Explainer How Can Districts Get More Time to Spend ESSER Dollars? An Explainer
Districts can get up to 14 additional months to spend ESSER dollars on contracts—if their state and the federal government both approve.
4 min read
Illustration of woman turning back hands on clock.
Education Week + iStock / Getty Images Plus Week
Education Funding Education Dept. Sees Small Cut in Funding Package That Averted Government Shutdown
The Education Department will see a reduction even as the funding package provides for small increases to key K-12 programs.
3 min read
President Joe Biden delivers a speech about healthcare at an event in Raleigh, N.C., on March 26, 2024.
President Joe Biden delivers a speech about health care at an event in Raleigh, N.C., on March 26. Biden signed a funding package into law over the weekend that keeps the federal government open through September but includes a slight decrease in the Education Department's budget.
Matt Kelley/AP
Education Funding Biden's Budget Proposes Smaller Bump to Education Spending
The president requested increases to Title I and IDEA, and funding to expand preschool access in his 2025 budget proposal.
7 min read
President Joe Biden delivers remarks on lowering prices for American families during an event at the YMCA Allard Center on March 11, 2024, in Goffstown, N.H.
President Joe Biden delivers remarks on lowering prices for American families during an event at the YMCA Allard Center on March 11, 2024, in Goffstown, N.H. Biden's administration released its 2025 budget proposal, which includes a modest spending increase for the Education Department.
Evan Vucci/AP