Equity & Diversity News in Brief

N.Y. Schools Will Remove Enrollment Obstacles

By Corey Mitchell — February 24, 2015 1 min read

New York State Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman announced last week that 20 districts have agreed to develop new enrollment policies after investigations unearthed a pattern of illegal enrollment requirements, including the presentation of Social Security cards by parents or guardians.

A joint investigation by the state education department and the attorney general’s office found the districts, despite repeated warnings from federal and state law-enforcement agencies, continued to bar children from enrolling, solely because of their immigration status.

Districts are allowed to ask for proof of residency, but the investigation found that they refused to enroll undocumented youths and unaccompanied minors if they were unable to produce documents demonstrating guardianship or residency in the state.

A version of this article appeared in the February 25, 2015 edition of Education Week as N.Y. Schools Will Remove Enrollment Obstacles

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